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Media Desktops (Apple) OS X Apple

Lack of Manpower May Kill VLC For Mac 398

Posted by timothy
from the vlc-generally-rocks dept.
plasmacutter writes "The Video Lan dev team has recently come forward with a notice that the number of active developers for the project's MacOS X releases has dropped to zero, prompting a halt in the release schedule. There is now a disturbing possibility that support for Mac will be dropped as of 1.1.0. As the most versatile and user-friendly solution for bridging the video compatibility gap between OS X and windows, this will be a terrible loss for the Mac community. There is still hope, however, if the right volunteers come forward."
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Lack of Manpower May Kill VLC For Mac

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday December 16, 2009 @04:56PM (#30464722)

    The DVD player that comes with Apple's computers is rather intolerant of scratches, etc., and will report "Skipping damaged area..." then skip ahead a ridiculous amount. VLC will play fine right through the supposedly damaged segment. Losing VLC for the Mac would be terrible. If I knew anything about programming, I'd think about joining this project.

    • by AbRASiON (589899) * on Wednesday December 16, 2009 @08:21PM (#30467578) Journal

      I still don't see enough buffering code and SPECIFICALLY buffering controls for users in any media player.
      I frequently play back files which just happen to be close to the bitrate of my wireless connection, why can't I have the program specifically pre-buffer 100mb of data and then play back from the 100mb? Then when the bitrate is higher, it drops to 80 or 50 but when it's lower, it re-fills.
      This is pretty straightforward stuff and yet, do we have these kind of controls?
      I want this on my PS3 media playbakc, my Xbox 360, Media player classic, GOM, VLC - everything damnit! I'm willing to goddamn wait as long as the end result is a smoother experience!
      I live in Australia, youtube and many flash videos here are frankly, bloody annoying, often we open a youtube video here, click play, let it start playing then quickly hit pause so it fills the full buffer :/ (if you don't quickly hit pause and it plays up to where the buffer end is, that can be a problem too)

      FWIW: I'm not a coder, perhaps this is significantly more complex than it sounds to impliment but damnit it could make many things smoother and simpler.

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by Techman83 (949264)
        I used this specific feature in Mplayer, as I was doing the same thing. 12Mb cache seemed to be enough for most streams, as bandwidth wasn't a huge issue, more the consistency of the connection (which can't be guaranteed with wireless as it's half duplex, well at least a/b/g are, I think n can do full duplex in certain configurations)
  • Moot (Score:3, Funny)

    by zokuga (1452025) on Wednesday December 16, 2009 @04:56PM (#30464724)
    Apple is poised to take over the whole video world in the next year. It'll be windows that needs the fancy VLC to watch Mac-made movies
    • Re:Moot (Score:5, Funny)

      by Selfbain (624722) on Wednesday December 16, 2009 @05:16PM (#30465112)
      So... you're saying next year will be the year of Mac?

      That sounds oddly familiar.
      • On the desktop!

        It will be the year of Mac on the Desktop. And about time, too!

        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          by PopeRatzo (965947) *

          On the desktop!

          And gaming! I predict 2010 will be the year Apple becomes the gaming platform of choice for trust-fund babies, unpublished writers who hang at Intelligentsia and men who tweeze their eyebrows.

          • And overprice computers!! I predict 2012 will be the year Apple becomes the platform of choice for those who want to spend a lot of money on shinys, want to feel smug about it and hang around starbucks... Did I miss anything?
  • Sick (Score:2, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward

    There's going to be a million and two volunteers now since this is ./'d

  • Mplayer OSX Extended (Score:5, Informative)

    by The J Kid (266953) on Wednesday December 16, 2009 @04:57PM (#30464748) Homepage Journal

    Sad to see VLC struggling, but there's always Mplayer OSX Extended [mplayerosx.sttz.ch] for the mac. Get the extra codec pack and it can play anything!

    • by Hatta (162192) on Wednesday December 16, 2009 @05:13PM (#30465076) Journal

      That's a good option for playing videos. But what makes VLC VLC, and not just VC, is the LAN support. VLC can pretty easily be set up as a video server as well as a player. You can't do this [engadget.com] with Mplayer.

    • by plasmacutter (901737) on Wednesday December 16, 2009 @05:31PM (#30465446)

      Sad to see VLC struggling, but there's always Mplayer OSX Extended [mplayerosx.sttz.ch] for the mac. Get the extra codec pack and it can play anything!

      Compare 1080p H.264 matroska playback in vlc to mplayer:

      on my macbook pro (exactly a year old at this point) vlc plays it without a stutter, mplayer extended will drop frames like an epileptic. Im sure they both drop frames, but VLC does so much more gracefully, resulting in no noticeable distortion, while mplayer extended makes it obvious (and incredibly annoying) to the viewer. Nothing like watching blade runner final cut and being slowly infuriated by those epic scenes being subjected to massive chop and screen tears.

      • by nxtw (866177) on Wednesday December 16, 2009 @05:43PM (#30465696)

        Compare 1080p H.264 matroska playback in vlc to mplayer:

        on my macbook pro (exactly a year old at this point) vlc plays it without a stutter, mplayer extended will drop frames like an epileptic. Im sure they both drop frames, but VLC does so much more gracefully, resulting in no noticeable distortion, while mplayer extended makes it obvious (and incredibly annoying) to the viewer. Nothing like watching blade runner final cut and being slowly infuriated by those epic scenes being subjected to massive chop and screen tears.

        The best results I've seen for a sufficiently high bitrate H.264 1080p stream on OS X was by using Media Player Classic Home Cinema running in Windows inside VMware. ~20 fps with tearing and OK audio. Compare to VLC, which was able to play the video at ~24 fps during low motion screens and then just stop updating the picture for a while if decoding couldn't keep up. MPlayer would stop playing altogether if the CPU couldn't keep up. QuickTime + Perian took forever to load the video and then froze when I tried to play it.

        In Windows with H.264 hardware decoding disabled the video plays fine. The video also plays fine in Windows (and with lower CPU usage) with hardware decoding enabled, of course. OS X doesn't support hardware H.264 decoding at all on this GPU (Radeon HD 2600). Even if it did, I don't know of any way to use OS X's H.264 hardware decoding support except on files natively supported by QuickTime X.

      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Make sure you have selected multithreaded FFmpeg in preferences. A single core of a modern processor is not able to decode 1080p H264 without dropping frames so you'll need the multithreaded option.

    • by rbrito (37104) <rbrito&ime,usp,br> on Wednesday December 16, 2009 @05:37PM (#30465604) Homepage Journal

      (This message may be seen as inflammatory, but I assure you that it is just my opinion and not particularly anybody else---I don't speak for the projects on which I participate).

      Hi.

      I am not a developer of VLC, but I am part of the LAME team (that MP3 encoder that a good amount of people use). I see similar problems regarding LAME as those described by the VLC team: lack of continuous power and resources.

      Some users just magically think that "oh, this program won't exist anymore, so let's use this other one". The sad thing here is that they are shortsighted in the fact that they, by doing nothing (just receiving the programs), are not giving the incentive for the projects.

      What about if the proposed alternative dies a few days from now? The amount of alternatives is finite.

      Not only that, but the major players out there all share the same codebase: there are "incestuous" (in a good sene of the word) relations with VLC, xine, and mplayer: the all use, to some extent or another (well, in some cases, to the full extent) some common libraries: ffmpeg, libmp3lame, theora, vorbis, dirac, x264 and so on.

      Usually, also, the players also send some feedback to the people writing the libraries and, without them, the libraries would not be as good as they are. And the feedback that developers provide is, not infrequently, in form of patches, or constructive suggestions. Some users, like the one above, just cares less and, honestly, where would you just "grab the extra codec" if they all, come, essentially, from the first place?

      If you didn't know, perhaps it is a good reminder to put here that people from the VLC project developed the nice libdvdcss library, which benefited xine and mplayer, while people in the other projects have directly or indirectly benefited the others.

      I would not like to have the "Linux desktop" mainstream with a "community" with a person that doesn't want a community. For people that are more altruistic (and that show it, instead of just playing in slashdot all day), I am open to a more open talk.

      [Gee, from what I wrote the above, it seems like if I only saw Linux---I actually value the other Unix-like operating systems as much].

      I guess that what I meant to say here is: "Talk is cheap. Show me the code. Don't wish the death of what you may proudly use and not even know".

      Regards, Rogério Brito.

  • user-friendly? (Score:3, Informative)

    by Yvan256 (722131) on Wednesday December 16, 2009 @04:58PM (#30464780) Homepage Journal

    Whoever takes the job, please remove the stupid "anything I want to play gets added to a stupid playlist" thing. When I open a video with QuickTime, it plays that video. If I open another video at the same time, it opens up another QuickTime window.

    VLC is more like QuickTime (video player) but it currently acts more like iTunes (media library player).

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by ickleberry (864871)
      Strange. on Linux it opens up a new instance every time. Of course the correct behaviour would be just to have an 'enqueue' option in the context menu for that file which you can then set as the default option if you desire
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by wiredlogic (135348)

        VLC has a command line option "--no-playlist-enqueue" that controls that behavior. Under Windows the default action is "Play" which enqueues but there is also an action called "Play with VLC media player" that doesn't. There is another action that enqueues but doesn't play the file passed as the argument. These extra actions are, as usual, accessible through the explorer context menu. I suppose OSX could have a similar behavior.

        Here are the command lines for each action:

        Play: "...\VideoLAN\VLC\vlc.exe"

      • Pretty sure that's an option somewhere in VLC; on Windows it does the Mac single-window thing by default, and there was an "advanced option" to change it iirc. But on Linux it opened a new window by default. Lots of people with >1 monitor these days...

        Now if only the flashtards at youtube et al would realize you might want to maximize a video on one screen and touch the keyboard in another window, that the entire world does not grind to a halt just because you're doing your job... and if only they'd le
    • Re:user-friendly? (Score:5, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday December 16, 2009 @05:57PM (#30465916)

      Whoever takes the job, please remove the stupid "anything I want to play gets added to a stupid playlist" thing. When I open a video with QuickTime, it plays that video. If I open another video at the same time, it opens up another QuickTime window.

      VLC is more like QuickTime (video player) but it currently acts more like iTunes (media library player).

      Have you even bothered to open the preferences? It right there in the Interface pane (simple settings view):
      Allow only one instance [x]
      Enqueue files when in one instance mode[x]
      Just uncheck "Allow only one instance".

  • Why do they need a special OS X build? Shouldn't it build the same way it does on any UNIX?

    • Re:OS X is UNIX (Score:5, Informative)

      by Penguinisto (415985) on Wednesday December 16, 2009 @05:05PM (#30464934) Journal

      Not exactly... Apple has been slowly squeezing the Carbon (std. C++ lib set) into non-existence, which means you get to do it in Cocoa (that is, Obj-C). IIRC, there's no 64-bit Carbon love in SL, though the 32-bit Carbon libs should still be happily intact.

      There's also (IIRC) Grand Central to contend with when you're dinking around with video, and I doubt that you could find an easy parallel for that when porting in from *nix.

      Been way the hell too long (something like 4 years) since I've had to do any serious OSX stuff though, so take all of this with a block of salt.

      • Re:OS X is UNIX (Score:5, Informative)

        by joe_bruin (266648) on Wednesday December 16, 2009 @08:38PM (#30467728) Homepage Journal

        Not exactly... Apple has been slowly squeezing the Carbon (std. C++ lib set) into non-existence, which means you get to do it in Cocoa (that is, Obj-C).

        Objective C / C++ is only required for doing the UI. 99% of your project can remain in C or C++ with only a very thin shim in Obj-C for the UI layer. There is no requirement to move your code base to except for the Mac-specific UI layer.

        IIRC, there's no 64-bit Carbon love in SL, though the 32-bit Carbon libs should still be happily intact.

        There is no 64 bit Carbon, because it's a relic. Cocoa easily mixes with C code (Obj-C is just C with extra stuff). Unless you're Adobe and you have a huge amount of UI code in Carbon, there is no reason to keep hanging on to it.

        There's also (IIRC) Grand Central to contend with when you're dinking around with video, and I doubt that you could find an easy parallel for that when porting in from *nix.

        Grand Central Dispatch is not required for video at all. Mac OS X supports the standard POSIX pthreads interface for threading.

    • by GWBasic (900357)

      Why do they need a special OS X build? Shouldn't it build the same way it does on any UNIX?

      Because Apple's video and GUI APIs are different then what KDE and Gnome use.

      You really can only do "write once, compile everywhere" for libraries, console apps, and X. Once you're tying into the look and feel of an operating system and its core IO systems, you need to have platform specific code.

      • by LWATCDR (28044)

        Actually I think that VLC has moved to QT for the interface so the GUI should port. The video playback code me be more difficult to deal with but I have looked at the code.
        Even if the "Build" is identical and it will never be you still need someone to build and test the software!

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by GWBasic (900357)

          Actually I think that VLC has moved to QT for the interface so the GUI should port

          I doubt that QT provides the video and audio abstraction needed. VLC does things like directly use the SPDIF, which is pretty low-level.

  • Handbrake (Score:2, Informative)

    by Yvan256 (722131)

    Let's remember that Handbrake uses VLC for video decoding. No more VLC = no more handbrake.

    • Really? (Score:5, Informative)

      by Wesley Felter (138342) <wesley@felter.org> on Wednesday December 16, 2009 @05:13PM (#30465066) Homepage

      I thought Handbrake uses FFMPEG. Anyway, if Handbrake uses some VLC code then the Handbrake developers will probably continue to maintain that code without necessarily having to maintain VLC as a whole.

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by StonyUK (173886)

        I think they rely on VLC to supply the dvd decryption library, presumably so they don't have to include anti-DRM goodness in their own package.

    • Handbrake doesn't have to use VLC. I think it was just an easy way to get access to the FFMPEG libraries, to require that VLC be installed. Anyway, I'm sure it wouldn't be too hard for them to find another way to deal with it.

      And I may be wrong, but I think using VLC is a relatively new thing. I don't remember exactly, but back when Handbrake was OSX-only, I think it had the option of using Quicktime to encode movies.

    • by MikeFM (12491)

      I'm willing to pay for VLC/Handbrake to be maintained. Dropping support is dumb before pitching to users to pay to keep someone on the job.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by devjj (956776) *
      That's not quite correct. Handbrake requires VLC to rip video directly from a copyright-protected DVD. FFmpeg is built into the Handbrake distribution itself.
  • If this were a worthy project, Father Steve would have told us so.
  • If enough people are missing a feature in 1.1.0 release, someone will take the source and add it. As for any product and platform, development is a matter of supply and demand. It could be that physical media like DVDs is simply on the way out and most Mac users are happy with Quicktime player to watch H.264 torrents.

    • by ktappe (747125)
      ....except that nearly everything I want to watch is still .avi. If .mp4 takes over, great, but until then I need VLC.
      • by mrxak (727974)

        And you'll still be able to use VLC, there just won't be any new versions for a while. Chances are, as grandparent said, somebody else will come along soon enough. I'm glad this article is here because it might generate some interest, and maybe next week we'll get an article saying "VLC for Mac Saved!"

      • by devjj (956776) *
        That's sort of your choice, isn't it? Everything I watch is MKV-encapsulated h.264, and I have no problems playing any of it on my Macs or PCs. Better video quality and an open container format? Sold.
        • by Bert64 (520050)

          What i want to know is, how to get MKV encapsulated h.264 to use the hardware decode capability of modern macs? I have a current gen macbook pro which should be able to handle this, only it doesn't unless i rip the mkv file apart and put the h.264 stream into a different container format.

  • Why use VLC as a player when Perian [perian.org] installs codecs that allow quicktime player (or any quicktime based app) to play back anything VLC will. It's basically ffdshow for mac. I rarely use VLC anymore for that reason. Quicktime player just feels more lightweight as it starts up faster.
    • by Sancho (17056)

      I like the Matroska container. It's easy, extensible, and frankly it handles just about anything you can throw into it.

      Quicktime+Perian handles Matroska poorly. VLC handles it splendidly. That's why I prefer VLC.

      • by Psyborgue (699890)
        I had the same issues in the past but it seems to work perfectly with the most recent update. Chapter markers even work properly.
        • by Sancho (17056)

          I'll check it out. The problem really doesn't present itself until you're using low-speed storage--either something off of a USB drive or on a slow network. In the past, you effectively had to read the entire file before playing it, so large files would take forever to start playing from e.g. an NFS share (though once they started, you could index into them just fine.)

          • by Psyborgue (699890)
            The reading before playing thing? Yeah. That is still there, but I've never tried playing mkv off low speed storage... I suppose it's something the Perian developers should look into.
            • by Psyborgue (699890)
              i need to correct myself. You don't have to read the entire file before playing. You do, however, have to wait for the part of the file you want to play to load sequentially before you attempt to play it. Playing from the beginning has always worked fine for me.
              • by Sancho (17056)

                Fair enough.

                I've assumed that the problem I had was related to this:
                http://perian.org/#support [perian.org]

                Why does it take so long for MKV to load?

                QuickTime expects to know about the entire movie when playing it, but that's not possible with many formats, including MKV and MPEG. Ask Apple to support seeking without an index if you'd like this to go away!

                I had hopes that Quicktime X might have removed that restriction, but I think that Perian would have to be recoded to take advantage of it.

    • Quicktime + Perian can't solve my "source videos are unusually low in volume, or my laptop speakers suck"... which happens a lot. VLC is nice in that the volume slider goes to 4x.

      I also have never had issues with playback in VLC where QT+Perian did any better.

      • by Psyborgue (699890)

        I also have never had issues with playback in VLC where QT+Perian did any better.

        I've had some instances of that. On the other hand i've had instances where VLC won't play something properly that Perian will. Good points about the volume, though, and I think it's great that VLC is around. When it's needed, it is nice to have around and I hope they find at least one developer.

  • OS X needs VLC (Score:2, Informative)

    by jasonwc (939262)

    I think seeing VLC die on the Mac would do much more harm than the death of the Windows version. There is plenty of wonderful video programs that allow you to easily tweak what filters and codecs you use, and pretty much can support any codecs you want. MPC-HC comes to mind as the most versatile. VLC is still useful for formats that you don't use very much - like *.flv, or videos that may not work for whatever reason in another video program.

    However, on the Mac, there are far fewer options. A few days ago,

    • by nneonneo (911150)

      Have you tried the "apply to all files of this type" in the Get Info window? AFAIK this is how you re-associate a file extension to a new program.

      As for Quicktime's formats, try Perian [perian.org]: it is a codec pack for QuickTime (a la Directshow) which integrates ffmpeg, MKV, and a few other formats.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by stevelup (445596)

      I couldn't get OS X to use VLC by default. Selecting "open with" VLC ALWAYS only works for that single file, not the file type, despite it saying so.

      To set a default application for a file type in OS X, you do the following:-

      Right click on any MKV file and choose 'Get Info'
      In the 'Open With' section, choose VLC
      Click the 'Change All...' button underneath.

      All MKV files will now open by default in VLC

    • Re:OS X needs VLC (Score:4, Insightful)

      by ducomputergeek (595742) on Wednesday December 16, 2009 @06:06PM (#30466090)

      So, basically, you're mad that it won't play your pirated movies out of the box? I've got karma to burn, so time to feed the trolls.

      Yeah, I'm going to assume that you really have no idea how the encoder/decoder market works or video production in general. Basically, there are companies that create codecs like DivX and then require payment to encode and distribute videos using their codec because of patents. In order for Apple to ship DivX, they would have to license DivX from DivX. Why should apple pay the licensing fee when they can direct users here: http://www.divx.com/en/mac [divx.com] and the user can download and install for free? I mean the last time I dealt with Windows I remember having to go and fetch the DivX Codec. And the last time I set up a new Mac, QuickTime popped up when it could find the Codec, knew what kind of file it was, and provided a link to the Divx site to go download it. All of this has to do with Licensing. It's really more of a legal issue than a technical one. So how is software licensing and patents preventing them from shipping every codec known to man Apple's fault again? Because unlike a lot of F/OSS projects, Apple can't be 100% based out of Hungry or France to circumvent these licensing restrictions. The do business in the United States and other countries that do recognize and enforce these copyright treaties. Technically, downloading and using VLC and FFMPEG in the United States constitutes infringement on various Codec patents, but that's a topic for another thread and another day. Also I would check on Windows. If it shipped with DivX, chances are that was added by the PC vender in a 3rd party deal, not by Microsoft. (Actually I don't pay attention to who is licensing what these days).

      MKV isn't a format, it's a container. Just like .MOV is a container as is .AVI. The quality inside a .MKV, .AVI, or .MOV is all dependent upon the compression and codecs used not the container format. And the last time I tried playing MKV files, the program took up WAY too many system resources. The only place that I've seen MKV as a popular format is with Azurus/Vuze. In fact, I've never seen it used outside of Vuze. Occasionally you'll see it in a torrent, but they are mostly DivX/Avi.

      The fact that macs can't play Blu-Ray or HD-DVD has to do with the fact that Apple doesn't ship any models with said player. MAC LACKS THE HARDWARE NEEDED IN ORDER TO READ EITHER FORMAT That has nothing to do with Quicktime and Codecs. When I worked in video production, nobody was adopting either optical format. It was clear to many of us that Optical Media was going the way of the floppy disk and this was in 2003. By the time HD-DVD or Blu-Ray won the format wars, it would be too late, we'd see everything delivered via a digital stream. The only question was, is it going to be an iTunes like store where you buy the item to a set top box/hard drive or whether it was going to be via streaming like Hulu or Netflix. So far it looks like there is a market for both. But time will tell.

      And I see a lot of people electing to skip the Blu-Ray player in favor of a media PC/Mac hooked up to their TV and streaming Netflix or Hulu to their TV. I've been using a Mac MIni for this purpose since 2005. I know I have. To me, the extra quality for twice the price of a DVD plus the cost of the player isn't worth it to me. I'll put up with watching my TV shows from Hulu when I have extra time at my connivence, even if the quality isn't the same as on HD. It' good enough for me and plenty of other people too.

      Now, I have to say that I'm generally happy with Quicktime X. Quicktime had been languishing for years and this was a much needed up date. It runs faster and smoother than the previous versions.

    • by jo_ham (604554)

      Perian adds all of those codecs that you claim is "not easy" to add support for. A few clicks and it's installed. Log out and back in again at the installer's suggestion (not essential) and the job is done.

      Not sure what your issue is with HD h.264 content - works just fine for me (HD files created from XDCAM HD source material, YMMV).

      Divx support is easily added via perian, or using the standalone DivX installer from their main website - not sure how you didn't find that.

      To force a change to stick regarding

    • With Perian installed (have you been living in a cave?) Quicktime handles every AVI, MPG, FLV, and MKV file I've thrown at it in years. Quicktime Player in Snow Leopard doesn't think it can open MKV files, but that's why you don't remove Quicktime Player 7 (there's an option for this in the upgrade, because QP7 does things the new QP can't.)

  • I suspect they will find more development help when the job market improves (hopefully soon)... :-/

  • I'll help! (Score:5, Informative)

    by MrCrassic (994046) <deprecated&ema,il> on Wednesday December 16, 2009 @05:37PM (#30465594) Journal

    I wanted to respond directly to the person who put this post up, but I don't want to register for yet another forum.

    I'll gladly help develop for the project. My knowledge in video and audio processing is very weak (I took a class on it, but I didn't really put too much work into it), but my skills in C and C++ are pretty good (but not expert). I'm also pretty well-versed in Java, though it's been a while since I needed to whip it out. Finally, I'm slowly, but surely, learning Objective-C.

    Please e-mail me at the address listed here. I don't want to see this die! I just migrated over to OS X and find this app extremely helpful, especially from my use of it in Windows.

    • by MrCrassic (994046)

      Sorry to respond to my own post, but if you feel compelled to help too, reply to this! It'd be pretty cool to get a team going. -mrc

    • Re:I'll help! (Score:5, Informative)

      by plasmacutter (901737) on Wednesday December 16, 2009 @06:00PM (#30465984)

      I submitted the story. I'm not a member of the dev team, but give the popularity of VLC on this platform it absolutely astounded me this issue had not appeared on a major news site yet.

      The forum thread linked from the article suggests you present yourself to the developer mailing list.

      here [videolan.org] is a list of all the videolan project's mailing lists - I believe the one they want you to contact them through is vlc-devel [videolan.org]

      Thank you for offering, i'd do so myself if i were not utterly sub-novice.

  • by msevior (145103) on Wednesday December 16, 2009 @06:05PM (#30466072)

    There are very few Open Source developers for OSX. Unfortunately we, AbiWord, have exactly the same issue. We *almost* had version 2.8 ready for OSX but we lost our lead OSX developer and there is no one to replace him. Rather than delay 2.8, we simply went ahead with 2.8 for Linux and Windows.

    • by Salsaman (141471) on Wednesday December 16, 2009 @10:35PM (#30468640) Homepage

      I have the same problem with the LiVES project. Over 3 years ago, I managed to compile the sourcecode for OSX/Darwin, it took a lot of fiddling around, but it worked. I excitedly posted the news on the website and mailing lists, but no OSX users seemed interested. Since then, the code has changed a lot, fixes were made for it to compile on IRIX and Solaris.
       
      Recently somebody posted a forum message noting how easy it now is to compile under OSX [sourceforge.net]. I again posted this news, and asked if somebody could kindly compile it and send me a link to the resulting binary. Since then...nothing. Hence I have come to a conclusion about OSX users...well, I will let you guess what it is.

That does not compute.

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