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How to Turn Your PC into a Mac 492

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the yeah-that'll-fool-ya dept.
An anonymous reader writes "CNet is running a Mac fanboy's idea of a nightmare feature entitled 'Mock OS X: Five ways to make your PC more like a Mac'. While the idea of turning my PC into a Mac-like machine does get my juices flowing, I'm not sure the user experience would be exactly the same but I'm going to spend this afternoon trying it out anyway. "To borrow a metaphor from Spartacus, some people like oysters and some people like snails. Except what if there was a way to make your snail do some of the cool things oysters can do, like make pearls? And what if you could make your PC do some of the cool stuff that Macs do so well?"" Seems to me that this would be a lot easier if step one was install linux...
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How to Turn Your PC into a Mac

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  • DIY? (Score:5, Funny)

    by telchine (719345) on Monday November 26, 2007 @08:43AM (#21478141)
    I haven't RTFA, but by any chance does this involve giving the retailer twice what it's worth for the system and then using a screwdriver to prise off a mouse button or two?
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by hal2814 (725639)
      You'd also need to uninstall about 3/4 of your games and pay double for the ones you still have left.
      • Re:DIY? (Score:5, Insightful)

        by omeomi (675045) on Monday November 26, 2007 @10:25AM (#21479301) Homepage
        Am I the only one who's tired of the PC being cast as the boring office-machine while OSX is fun? Or, as the article puts it, "ancient HP WageSlave 486s in strip-lit spreadsheet farms across the world". Not that I give a crap about which OS is more fun...I'm just tired of hearing the same message repeated over and over again. Yeah, I get it, Apple wants me to think PCs are for work, and Macs are for fun.

        Less is more. War is peace. 2+2=5.

        Whatever.

        I'm currently typing this on a Mac, but seriously, gaming has always been way better on the PC than on the Mac, and while OSX comes with better entry-level multimedia-creation tools, on the professional front, I can't think of a single OSX application that doesn't have a comparable Windows-based competitor. It's not like anybody serious about movie or music making would use iMovie or GarageBand, anyway.
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by Cal Paterson (881180) *

          Am I the only one who's tired of the PC being cast as the boring office-machine while OSX is fun?
          Am I the only tired of the PC being cast as a Windows machine? There are a whole host of operating systems that run on IBM PC's. In fact, OSX is one of the one operating systems that does not.

          If you mean Windows, say "Windows".
          • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

            by Mister Whirly (964219)
            Yeah. I sure wouldn't want to slight the rather large percentage of PC owners who are running OS/2. They would both really be pissed.
          • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

            by omeomi (675045)
            Am I the only tired of the PC being cast as a Windows machine?

            I said PC because I meant PC. I didn't specifically mention Linux, but when talking about games, I said "PC". To me, that includes Linux, because you can run a lot of Windows games on Linux using Wine. I only referred to Windows when talking about professional multimedia creation tools, because that is an area where Linux is seriously lacking.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by sm62704 (957197)
      I'd have modded this comment "funny" (as it was obviously intended) rather than "troll". OTOH I'd have modded the summmary "flamebait" for it suse of the phrase "Apple Fanboy". Actually the whole summary was rather trollish; if the summary was a comment and I was modding I'd mad it "Troll".

      I'm not an Apple user; I run XP and Mandriva dual-boot and don't even have an iPod, but that summary was a troll. And the word "fanboy" is flamebait whether you're commenting on Apple, Microsoft, Linux, Be, Sun, or any ot
  • WTF (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday November 26, 2007 @08:49AM (#21478197)
    Next time I see tripe like this on the firehose I'm going to throw a negative on it, instead of just ignoring it. Get stardock and window blinds? I mean seriously ...
  • DeskSpace has a much flashier spinning-cube effect for the Apple 'wow' factor, as you can see from the manufacturer's screenshot above.

    The thing that I like about most Apple 'wow' factors is they're non-intrusive. Flipping between screens I don't want a 1 second visualization. I do it constantly and it'd get annoying and in my way. When I switch users. I don't mind that extra second because I do it once and it's nice to show that I'm actually switching users.
  • A better idea... (Score:5, Interesting)

    by jamar0303 (896820) on Monday November 26, 2007 @08:51AM (#21478225)
    Or, instead of just replicating the look, you can put some real work into it and get the real thing- OSx86. Of course, apparently it's illegal in some countries- at least it's not in mine.
    • by ByOhTek (1181381)
      I was gonna post that.

      Anyway, Yeah: If you want to use MacOS, at $129, it not much more than the cheaper OEM windows, and it's certainly better than the non-OEM, or higher-end OEM Windows. Add in the effort to run it on non-mac hardware, and some time+effort, and you have yourself MacOS.
    • by sm62704 (957197) on Monday November 26, 2007 @09:17AM (#21478487) Journal
      Of course, apparently it's illegal in some countries- at least it's not in mine.

      Drugs, gambling, and prostitution are are illegal in mine, but that never stopped me from smoking pot, making bets, or getting laid. [slashdot.org] In fact, my favorite hooker lost a bet and now owes me a joint and a blowjob.

      If my politicians weren't for sale to the highest bidder I'd have a bit of respect for the law. If the government wants my respect they're going to have to be a bit more respectable. If the USA ever stops being a plutocracy I'll obey the law.

      -mcgrew
  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday November 26, 2007 @08:52AM (#21478229)
    Crassius: Do you eat oysters?
    Antoninus: Yes.
    C: Snails?
    A: No.
    C: Do you consider the eating of oysters to be moral and the eating of snails to be immoral?
    A: No, master.
    C: Of course not. Its all a matter of taste, isnt it?
    A: Yes, master.
    C: And taste is not the same as appetite and therefore not a question of morals, is it?
    A: It could be argured so, master.
    C: Um, thatll do. My robe, Antoninus. Ah, my taste includes both oysters and snails.

    Or how sexual preferences can become a topic in a Mac / PC comparison...

  • Way #6 (Score:2, Insightful)

    Way #6: Install Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon. It includes most of this stuff right out of the box and the rest can be added right from Synaptic.

  • by rolfwind (528248) on Monday November 26, 2007 @08:54AM (#21478247)
    It's always been resistant toward going to the middle-low and low-end market in terms of price. In the 90s, they experimented with licensing out their software and letting generic makers market hardware bundled with it -- but it cannabalized their own sales.

    I wonder if they could make it work differently today -- if they stipulate that the manufacturers couldn't make any hardware over $500 or so. Just to catch the low-end market for marketshare but not having the support headaches and losses that cheap manufacturers often bring.

    Even in the PC market there are higher-end manufacturers (Lenovo/IBM laptops) so why not apple? With the price ceiling in the contract, I can't imagine the other manufacturers will put out a pretty package that will compete with Apple directly but one for budget conscious consumers that Apple could never have hoped to catch anyway.
    • by dbrutus (71639)
      I don't believe it's legal, at least in the US, to segment markets this way. IANAL
    • If they wanted to go after the low-end market, they wouldn't need to go with cheap manufacturing or licensing the OS. Right now, when the latest and greatest processor comes out, it replaces their top-of-the-line and whatever was on the bottom falls off the face of the earth - and usually the price points stay the same for top, middle, and bottom. Now that they've had a few iterations on Intel, all they'd have to do was next time they upgrade, keep the bottom option around at a cheaper price instead of ceas
  • by garcia (6573) on Monday November 26, 2007 @08:54AM (#21478253) Homepage
    My father just bought my mother a 17" Macbook because he couldn't find a laptop he wanted to buy for her that didn't require you to buy Vista and then downgrade to XP later.

    My mother despises MacOS and can't "figure anything out." Now while I don't care for MacOS myself I tried to explain some things over the phone to her so that she would at least be able to use it for the time being until my well-meaning father can figure out what to do to fix things for her. She pretty much was being unreasonable about the whole thing and said over and over, "I'm 57 years old, I don't want to learn something else."

    My question for all of you is how, when I'm there at Christmas, do I make MacOS X more like Windows so that she's more comfortable with using the OS?
    • That's silly, Vista includes downgrade rights, doesn't it?

      Now you've paid for a pretty computer but you'll now have to do a lot of unnecessary work to modify or replace the OS. I'd suggest installing Windows XP and be done with it.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Thornburg (264444)
      Umm, use Boot Camp to install Windows XP? It even lets you dual-boot, you don't have to trash the Mac OS to do it.
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by isa-kuruption (317695)
      Yes,

      Start by adding a cronjob that crashes the machine every 2.5 hours.
      Second thing to do is to install some spyware.
      Finally, you want to buy her a more-than-one-button mouse.

      Good luck!
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by rolfc (842110)
      I think you should find another mother! That way you would be more comfortable.
    • by TobyRush (957946) on Monday November 26, 2007 @09:07AM (#21478363) Homepage

      My question for all of you is how, when I'm there at Christmas, do I make MacOS X more like Windows so that she's more comfortable with using the OS?

      Install BootCamp with Windows XP.

      However, if you're looking to keep her on MacOS because of the security or something else, then you'll need to figure out what specifically she's missing from Windows. Often, with casual users, it's just interface stuff that throws them for a loop, and that can be pretty easy to solve. Does she miss contextual menus (i.e., right-clicking in Windows?)? Get her a two-button mouse or show her the multi-touch trackpad capabilities (like two-fingered click = right-click). Does she miss the Start menu? Set up a folder in the dock with her favorite stuff.

      Of course it may be that she just doesn't like using computers, and is using the MacOS/Windows thing as an excuse to avoid them...

    • by Serious Callers Only (1022605) on Monday November 26, 2007 @09:10AM (#21478413)
      If you want a Vista experience [youtube.com] this applescript should do it - set it as a folder action on her Documents folder :


      on adding folder items to thisFolder after receiving addedItems
            repeat with anItem in addedItems
                tell application "Finder"
              display dialog "Are you sure you want to proceed?" buttons ["Allow", "Deny"] default button (random number (1)) + 1
                end tell
            end repeat
      end adding folder items to

      • by minniger (32861)
        Er.... This makes me chuckle and shake my head at the same time.

        Applescript is great... it is also amazingly weird.

        Yet another mystery of life.

    • by toQDuj (806112)
      There is no solution. If people emotionally dislike a certain thing, there's very little one can do to turn that feeling around. It's a shame really, the 17" macbook (pro) is a nice machine, if it's anything like my 4.5 year old powerbook G4. Very reliable and sturdy. Although by now, it has developed a slight squeak :).

      B.
    • by waa (159514)
      My question for all of you is how, when I'm there at Christmas, do I make MacOS X more like Windows so that she's more comfortable with using the OS?

      Print this out on a color printer and tape it to her screen:
      Windows Emulator for MAC OSX [weblogs.com]

    • by krunk7 (748055) on Monday November 26, 2007 @09:38AM (#21478717)

      She pretty much was being unreasonable about the whole thing and said over and over, "I'm 57 years old, I don't want to learn something else."

      I had to put up with tons of phone calls to support windows, clean of viruses, etc. my mother and father's windows computers. One of my main tasks when I came home to visit was "Look at the computer for a while", which means try and make it run like new.

      I bought them a Mac about 2 years ago. At first, I got the same response. Endless whining about not wanting to learn something new. I simply told them that I was their computer "advisor and repairman", this was a lower maintenance, lower risk machine and if they chose to go back to windows they'd be on their own from here on out. Stick with mac and I'll be their free tech support bitch again.

      Took a month or so, but now they'd never use windows again. In 2.5 years, I've received 4 phone calls. Two of them were a broke cable modem. The cable company kept telling her "it was a mac thing", but a surge had killed the modem. After insisting they replace the modem, everything worked. One of the calls was to ask me how to get from Hotmail to Gmail + Apple Mail.app. The third was to ask how to connect the internet, which used to be quite the support call with windows. Yes, I can do it quickly but trying to get a 55 year old woman who learned computers relatively recently to "Go to start, Right click Network Icon, blah blah" proved quite the trial often involving a couple of reboots and head scratching on why the hell it wouldn't come up. With her new Mac my only support advise was "Plug in the wire that looks like a huge phone plug on the end into the only place it'll go on the back of the computer".

      My only point being, she comes to you for advice because she knows no better. If she's going to be stubborn, then return in kind. Just tell her you'll never help with computer issues again if she doesn't put minimal effort into learning her new one (I mean really, 99% of the effort is learning two new icons: Safari & Mail). Little does she know you won't really be doing any tech support whether she stays with mac or not. ;)

      • by pikine (771084) on Monday November 26, 2007 @10:50AM (#21479603) Journal

        I successfully converted my mom to use a Mac Mini this summer. One time she mistakenly hid the dock. She panicked and called me, but she didn't know what it's called. All she said was "the icons disappeared."

        I ssh'd into her computer and ran OSXvnc server (now Vine server) tunneled over ssh. I noticed the problem and fixed it for her on the phone while she watched what I was doing. The most difficult part was to figure out what her IP address was in the first place.

        She didn't have to learn any new icons. Both Skype and Firefox icons look the same. She uses Yahoo! Mail and Gmail, so she didn't have to learn anything new.

    • Funny, the exact opposite happened to me. About a month ago, my sister and I got my mom an 20' iMac, to replace her XP laptop. Now, she couldn't be happier. She enjoys using the computer now, and the only thing she doesn't like is that things look much better on the screen, so she is alway tempted to buy stuff online.
    • Most Windows to Mac converts I know of throw hissy fits over the lack of a 'Maximize' button.

      Also, what exactly doesn't she like about it? Most older folks I know of who have switched to a Mac tend to have a tough time for the first week or two, and then generally fall into the swing of things. The biggest hump is realizing that MacOS and Windows are not 1:1 equivalents -- there are some Windows-y things that you wouldn't want to do in MacOS, and others that you wouldn't want to do in Windows...

      But for th
    • Send me the laptop and I'll go buy a Dell and send it back to you... I'll even get it with XP installed and preinstall Office 07 for you ;-p no worries, I love helping out people....
    • from a boomer here (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward
      Ask her if your dad got her a new top of the line mercedes if she could "figure out" how to drive it.

      She sounds like she just wants to run some applications and *not* an OS. Which is what most people do. Just show her how to run the probably few applications she needs, after that there isn't any need to "figure out" anything. You see this all the time really, business or personal, people learn a few applications and that's it, the rest of the machine never gets used (like bloated linux DVD distros, who the
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by samkass (174571)
      One of the nice features of Leopard (MacOS X 10.5) is that it's really, really easy to do screen sharing and show them stuff remotely from another Mac. If you're in a video chat with them via iChat, just select the button that requests screen sharing. It will ask the other user for permission, and if they grant it it will open up the firewall and set up a VNC connection with their machine as the server. You'll still be chatting with them, too, but the chat will shrink to the corner of the screen. No nee
  • That's silly (Score:3, Informative)

    by sm62704 (957197) on Monday November 26, 2007 @08:58AM (#21478277) Journal
    I didn't RTFA (I must not be new here) but people don't choose Macs because of any of the Apple's features. People choose Macs for stability and freedom from viruses and other shitware (the reasons we wipe Windows and install Linux) and because some high end graphics programs either aren't ported to Windows or are ported badly.

    The best way to make your Windows more "like a Mac" is to install Linux for its stability and freedom from shitware. That said, if I ever buy another whole computer (which I haven't done since 1987, I just upgrade parts as needed) It will be a Mac.

    I'm amused by the car commercial where they're touting its bluetooth, "powered by Microsoft". No way in hell I'd buy one, just because it's "(under)powered by Microsoft." ! I've been using Microsoft's OSes and programs for a quarter of a century, and they used to be the best quality out there. The quality has been declining for all that time, IMO right now Microsoft's OSes and programs are by far the very worst either on or off the market.

    -mcgrew
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by juiceCake (772608)

      People choose Macs for stability and freedom from viruses and other shitware (the reasons we wipe Windows and install Linux) and because some high end graphics programs either aren't ported to Windows or are ported badly./

      Of course many of us run Windows free of viruses, malware, and shitware, and with high end graphics program that are ported to Windows, and ported well. We edit video, create books, posters, illustrations, animations, etc. We also realize it's no longer the early 90s.

    • by Khuffie (818093)
      People choose Macs for stability and freedom from viruses and other shitware

      Really? I think you meant people switch to Macs for the illusion of stability and freedom from viruses. I've had XP running for 5 years with only AVG and it's firewall, and I've had no problem. The more people switch to Macs, the more they will be targetted by malware authors and that illusion of security will fade. To summarize: the problem with security, while helped by an insecure OS, is almost always due to oblivious users.
      • by finkployd (12902)
        The more people switch to Macs, the more they will be targetted by malware authors and that illusion of security will fade.

        Wow, been hearing that one for years. Maybe 2008 will finally be the "year of the Mac malware epidemic"
        • by Khuffie (818093)
          OS X still does not hold anywhere near a significant market share for it to be a viable target for malware authors.
          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by ToasterMonkey (467067)
            Right, I suppose that's Linux's excuse also. Security is so poo-poo on Mac OS X and Linux that they're only safe because they aren't big enough targets. uh huh.

            Look man, Windows security _was_ horrible.... nonexistent. Mac OS X and Linux are not in some security Dark Age just because they haven't had widespread attacks. If/when malware and viruses come to these platforms, they are plenty prepared. There wont be a repeat on the same scale as some older Windows attacks. Vista will have an easier time th
    • by elrous0 (869638) *
      Linux also give you the ability to commiserate with Apple users in wondering when the app you want to use is finally going to get ported.

      Don't get me wrong, I love the IDEA of Linux and Mac OS. But, the times I've tried it, the actual PRACTICE was a nightmare. It only made me aware, for the first time, of just how many of my favorite applications are Windows-only.

    • My first image was of children playing in a cardboard box. They have cut out a hole for their heads and painted a race car on the side. Now they have a race car! It too is un(der)powered, but not in their imaginations. The author puts lipstick on a pig and says its now more attractive. Of course, what we call imagination in children we call fiction when it comes from writers.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by kklein (900361)

      That said, if I ever buy another whole computer (which I haven't done since 1987, I just upgrade parts as needed) It will be a Mac.

      Be careful. I bought a Mac laptop because I couldn't stand the thought of living in a Vista world and I actually have to do things with my computer so Linux isn't an option. Now the Mac is starting to take over my entire computing life. I have put my work-provided computer in my filing cabinet because that MacBook plays better with the Windows domain than Windows, hits the wi-fi when I'm elsewhere on campus every time, and comes home and goes right to work here as well. It's astonishing how good it is

    • I didn't RTFA (I must not be new here) but people don't choose Macs because of any of the Apple's features. People choose Macs for stability and freedom from viruses and other shitware (the reasons we wipe Windows and install Linux) and because some high end graphics programs either aren't ported to Windows or are ported badly.

      While its true macs are comparatively far more stable and free from viruses when compared to windows, assuming they are 100% free of this stuff is being naive. Not to defend windows or attack the mac or anything, but the point is that macs aren't perfect, but they are good. Unfortunately their price tags keep most people away, why pay double for a mac when you can get a regular PC? Course with more linux pcs for sale which undercut even windows machines by 200 bucks, such as that walmart everex machi

    • Yes and install Dream Linux and it will look like a Mac and behave more like a Mac than you will ever get XP or Vista to.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by mdb303 (911529)
      people don't choose Macs because of any of the Apple's features

      Really?? I guess I must have been imagining it, then, when I chose to use Macs due to their superior UI, their Unix core, their high quality bundled applications, their superior hardware, etc., etc.

      Duh.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by donscarletti (569232)

      I've been using Microsoft's OSes and programs for a quarter of a century, and they used to be the best quality out there. The quality has been declining for all that time

      I call bullshit on that. In 1981, when MSDOS first came out there were plenty of advanced UNIX systems with multi-user capability, multitasking, memory protection, device abstraction etc. In 1984 the Mac was released which had a user friendly graphical UI and multimedia abilities while windows wouldn't be common for another 8 years. Now wi

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by CaptDeuce (84529)

      I didn't RTFA (I must not be new here) but people don't choose Macs because of any of the Apple's features.

      There is some truth to that. TFA featured Windows equivalents of the Dock, Exposé, Dashboard, Spaces, and -- for lack of a better term -- window & desktop skins. None of those will convince Average User to pick any OS over another.

      People choose Macs for stability and freedom from viruses and other shitware (the reasons we wipe Windows and install Linux) and because some high end graphi

  • UI Enhancements (Score:2, Informative)

    by CFBMoo1 (157453)
    UI enhancements like this scare me. There were a couple of computers that came in to the shop when i worked for a college campus RESNET that flat out refused to work with Cisco's network access software. Apparently the UI enchancement replaced a key OS DLL file that the Cisco stuff needed and wasn't compatable with the Cisco stuff. In order for that person to use their computer on our network we had to uninstall their UI software. Be careful what you purchase for UI enhancements.
  • Legality is an issue in many places, but FTS didn't mention Hackintosh or OSx86
    • by jamar0303 (896820)
      Yep- I did just that and I'm a happy camper. A Macbook just won't work for what I do- I have to use a Panasonic Toughbook. I hate Windows, and had a history with Mac (an old Powerbook that I managed to do $1000 of damage to in everyday use) so I went with OSx86. Wireless doesn't work, sure, but I've always plugged into Ethernet anyway- it's speedier and when I'm out and about I have a cell-modem that does work. Also, Tiger seems to do far better with a 1.2GHz Core Solo and 512MB RAM than XP does.
  • by WindBourne (631190) on Monday November 26, 2007 @09:03AM (#21478329) Journal
    Does anybody remember those fake plastic/fiberglass car bodies that you could put on top of various chassis? IIRC, there was a ferrari body for a VW frame. This reminds me of exactly that. It has a similar look, but where it counts, it is still a disaster.
  • Hurm...slightly ridiculous hyperbole given Apple's pathetic market share.
    • Hurm...slightly ridiculous hyperbole given Apple's pathetic market share.

      Not really. The true technological ground breakers in any industry often don't have near the market share of the lower end brands. BMW, Ferrari, Mercedes. Of course, we could look at Apple Inc. as an OEM rather then an OS vendor and in that case they're the 3rd largest in the world.

  • misses the point (Score:5, Insightful)

    by xirtam_work (560625) on Monday November 26, 2007 @09:05AM (#21478351)
    What makes Mac OS X special is not the glitz and glamour on the surface, it's what's underneath. The Cocoa framework for Objective C is head and shoulders above the MFC/Win32 programming approach. it's built on BSD and Mach and is now officially a Unix certified OS. It's built in a logical and elegant way. You can run Linux/Unix apps on it. X11 is included, although an optional install. OpenGl and Aqua make it beautiful to look at. There are literally hundreds of reasons why I prefer it, but won't go into them here.

    Simply skinning XP with an' aqua' style skin and adding a dock does not make it anything like OS X. Any more than putting a Ferrari shell on top of a ford doesn't make it a Ferrari.
    • by mattgreen (701203)

      What makes Mac OS X special is not the glitz and glamour on the surface, it's what's underneath. The Cocoa framework for Objective C is head and shoulders above the MFC/Win32 programming approach. it's built on BSD and Mach and is now officially a Unix certified OS.

      Wow, after all this time, I never realized that my Aunt Jemima preferred Macs because of their elegant architecture and Unix underpinnings! I shall now defer to her superior taste in matters of operating systems AND choice of maple syrup!

  • Why? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by DrXym (126579) on Monday November 26, 2007 @09:09AM (#21478401)
    There is nothing wrong with either XP's or Vista's look and feel. Why the hell would you want to make it look like OS X? It seems that if you absolutely love the look of OS X that the best way of obtaining it is to buy a Mac.
  • Or Linux can do it for free.

    gDesklets (for the old school method) or others to put in a docker, Slight Mac top-bar look with Gnome defaults, loads of various OS X cloned themes for Metacity ("Tish" comes to mind, but there are pinstripe, graphite and all other styles), Compiz to give you the 'wow' of desktop cubes (which you can crank up to 32x32 if you want) and fancy hidable widget layers etc. You can even move the buttons to the other side of the title bar quite easily.

    And then after a month or so you de
  • This is actually an advertisement for Stardock disguised as Apple fanboyism. The only paid product really indicated is the miserable dock application of the same company, which has much better and completely free alternatives. With the exception of Expose and Spaces, I'm pretty sure the author's entire range of features can be delivered by Stardock software.

    I also like how they avoid mentioning that you could just crack uxtheme.dll yourself, which is what FlyAKiteOS does, and theme to your heart's conten
    • by Tim Browse (9263)

      I also like how they avoid mentioning that you could just crack uxtheme.dll yourself, which is what FlyAKiteOS does, and theme to your heart's content, instead opting to plug WindowBlinds, which is again inferior due to sluggishness.

      Yeah that sounds easy. Out of interest, are you serious?

  • by Sockatume (732728) on Monday November 26, 2007 @09:25AM (#21478573)
    I for one do not welcome our metaphor-mangling CNET overlords.
  • by Neitokun (882224) <nmalynn@gmail.com> on Monday November 26, 2007 @09:26AM (#21478579) Homepage
    ObjectDock is garbage, Konfabulator sucks up system resources, and DeskSpaces looks no different than YDOM, which made my system thrash like no tomorrow. (Granted, I don't have a 3D card) I wonder how much StarDock paid to get top billing...
  • I don't get it. What will you end up with at the end of these hacks? Realistically, you'll end up with a rip-off variant on OSX that looks vaguely like it and runs the risk of being less stable than Windows usually is. I don't get it.

    OK, I'm a Mac user. Honestly, I tried to make my old Linux laptop more Mac-like even though it was not a very powerful laptop. It worked... and it worked quite well for my needs, but honestly it was problematic. After I finally replaced it with a Macbook Pro I discovered that m
  • Thanks to the nice folks over at kde and at beryl, I've already been there and done that - my PC is more like the Mac-like ideal than OS X has achieved. I have a 3D desktop, alpha blending support, smooth FAST scaling (infinitely variable zoom), object-oriented desktop and on top of all that I have a seven-button mouse which is fully supported by the desktop environment.

    This has all been possible for a PC for at least a couple of years now. Windows isn't the be-all-end-all of the PC world, even as much as M
  • You can't polish a turd.

    Yes, the UI of the Mac is very shiny compared to Windows. But all these applications do is layer crap on top of the Windows UI. They don't actually address what makes OS X so exciting to me, a recent switcher (coming up on 1 month).

    It's the architecture of the OS and the services it, and the applications it comes with, provides. It's Spotlight. It's the integration of my apps and data. It's Delicious Library starting up for the first time, checking my address book, and automatically
  • I know it's gonna sound weird but the only feature I envy to the Mac OS X interface is desktop icons starting from the right side of the desktop instead of the left, well this and seeing drives mounted on the desktop.

    For some reason it makes the whole difference to me, yet of all the customisation utilities I've tried, some would allow you to "save" the icon placement on the desktop, but none would allow you to have them automatically places to the right..

  • Anyone got the printer friendly version?? I *HATE* with passion those sparmticles where the content is split in lots of pages just to put more adds...
  • by davidwr (791652)
    When I can insert a commercial Mac DVD or download a Mac .DMG installer disk, run the installer, and run the apps, then I'll have a PC that looks and feels like a Mac [laughingsquid.com].

  • I still think the start button/task bar combination is a more logic division of "new things to do" and "things I'm working on now" than the Dock.

    And "install Linux"? Please. At work we run Linux desktops, Red Hat w/ Gnome. How much research would it take to find out why I can't copy and paste image data as well as text? How many decades has Mac and Windows been having clipboards that handled both seamlessly? (Ever since The Unix Haters Handbook [microsoft.com] pointed out how the clipboard does a fair chunk of what I'd oth
  • by dpbsmith (263124) on Monday November 26, 2007 @10:45AM (#21479531) Homepage
    I stopped reading the article right there.
  • by foldingstock (945985) on Monday November 26, 2007 @11:58AM (#21480515)
    Unlike OSX, running all that crap on Vista or XP (stardock, "myexpose", etc) will significantly slow windows down. You can't bolt on a load of [poorly designed] third party apps and say its more like OSX.

    Linux can run IE, that doesn't make it "more like windows."
  • by Tom (822) on Monday November 26, 2007 @12:12PM (#21480727) Homepage Journal
    TFA clearly shows why MS and everyone of the same mindset will never copy Apple: They focus on the entirely wrong things.

    Sure, Expose is nice, and the dock is better than the stupid taskbar (hey, what isn't?). But that isn't the point.

    The really good things about OS X, that you can't emulate with a couple shareware tools, or choosing an OS X like skin/theme. What sold me on OS X is that things just work. It really is that simple. Plug in some USB device, it just works. No annoying "looky, hardware!" wizard. You need something, anything (text, picture, diagram) from one app in another - drag & drop. Just works. On windos, it sometimes does, sometimes doesn't and the rest of the time gives you something you didn't expect (like the URL of the picture, or weirdly formatted text).
    The list goes on pretty much endless, and it all boils down to the computer doing what you want and expect it to do, instead of being a fairly accurate simulation of a wild beast that needs taming before you can use it, and where you should still never let your guard down.

    And that is the point, the nice GUI and useful additions are just icing on the cake.
  • by greywire (78262) on Monday November 26, 2007 @01:31PM (#21481851) Homepage
    Yes, that's right. My previous job provided me with a macbook pro for the 6 months I was there. I had to give it back when I took a much better job that provided me with a windows (vista..) notebook.

    I hadn't used a mac in many years. I used to be an Amiga guy. So I really wanted to be alternative pc guy again. I really wanted to be convinced to switch to mac. I wasn't. Maybe my brain has just turned to mush from the years of being mainstream pc-clone guy.

    What I liked about mac: the hardware is simply a work of modern art. Its a fabulously engineered machine. If I could afford it, I might buy one just for that reason and run windows on it. Unfortunately I cannot. Macos is, obviously, at its core, a superior OS. Sure its based on UNIX which was invented what, a whole decade before windows? So for what it does, it does extremely well. I love the near instant ON stand by mode, even though it runs the battery down it can last days. Dashboard is kinda cool, but I rarely used it, same thing for expose. Installing apps is great, usually just copying a folder into applications. Nice. Parallels is genious, especially coherance mode. Why can't the windows and linux versions do that?

    Fortunately for the mac, parallels is the only thing that made the mac bearable. Strangely, windows seemed to run better in parallels that it did directly on a pc (starting up faster, etc). Maybe that is just a testament to the apple hardware. But I simply couldn't do without some windows software I have grown used to, not to mention just having a much wider selection of things when I go looking for new software. I hate the finder, its worse than windows built in file manager, which also sucks, so I use directory opus (so I am making my pc more Amiga-like). This is huge for me.

    What I like about windows: the task bar. Sorry but I just cannot get used to the all-iconic mac ways. The dock or whatever its called is just confusing to me. I hate it. I like the textual windows task bar. I like the window previews in vista. I like the start menu even though it requires constant management to keep it from becoming cluttered by every program installing stuff on it. I like the menus on the windows not at the top of the screen (I've always hated that on the mac). windows runs on cheap hardware.

    Summary:

    Mac pros: what it does do, it does better. Parallels. Easy application install. Standby that works. Smooth but otherwise useless bling. Beautiful hardware. More secure.

    Mac cons: expen$ive, feels like a toy with limited options to protect me from myself, limited software selection

    Windows pros: task bar, cheap, more software, doesn't limit your options, directory opus file manager

    Windows cons: grossly inefficient design, buggy, ugly, standby is worthless, insecure, too long between major updates.

    * note: vista is largely excluded for me. It's total F*cking crap and I am about to revert to xp. I admire the concept behind the new composited desktop (an Idea I thought of years ago, and apparently isn't that hard to implement since linux and mac both have it). In theory, readyboost is neat idea. Doesn't seem to help though. If I had the choice between only Vista and Macos, I might choose macos, but only because I can run XP in parallels on the mac.
  • by porky_pig_jr (129948) on Monday November 26, 2007 @02:29PM (#21482685)
    still you wouldn't want to kiss it.

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