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iPhone Likely Set to Launch in the UK Next Week 127

Posted by Zonk
from the leaving-the-brits-in-the-cold dept.
An anonymous reader writes "According to CNet, the iPhone is likely to be launched in the UK next Tuesday. 'Yesterday we were invited to an Apple press conference to take place next Tuesday — and we think it's most likely going to be the UK iPhone launch. Apple, as always, is keeping tight-lipped but there are several clues that point in the iPhone's direction'. No word yet on a UK operator, pricing or whether or not it will have 3G."
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iPhone Likely Set to Launch in the UK Next Week

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  • by Realistic_Dragon (655151) on Saturday September 15, 2007 @05:36AM (#20614529) Homepage
    You can get a 3G plan (with data card) for your laptop for 10gbp/month here which is a bit more convenient than hooking up a cell phone.

    I use my N95 as a modem (it's faster than my home DSL! 10gb/mo transfer for $25) as well as streaming BBC radio (the on demand service) over the internet direct to the phone. However most people are not geeks and don't use the software toys that come with the handset.

    However they will have problems if they think they can charge for ring tones here (especially 2gbp/4usd each, which would be 2* the iTunes price as per the US). Unlike the US devices are *much less* locked down in the UK - USB mass storage mode is enabled by default and a cable comes in the box etc. This is true even of many sub $100 cheap phones. While people aren't geeks this doesn't extend to copying on/off ring tones where suddenly the most undereducated yob seems to acquire the technical skills of an IT expert. It must be something to do with motivation.
    • by drsquare (530038)

      You can get a 3G plan (with data card) for your laptop for 10gbp/month here which is a bit more convenient than hooking up a cell phone.
      Yes, what could be more convenient than carrying a laptop around in your pocket all day.
      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Yes, what could be more convenient than carrying a laptop around in your pocket all day.
        Typing on keys the size of pencil erasers?
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward
      Selling a device like the iPhone in a market like Europe without 3G support is destined to failure. 3G is a much bigger deal in the UK than in the US.
      • Selling a device like the iPhone in a market like Europe without 3G support is destined to failure. 3G is a much bigger deal in the UK than in the US.

        That's true from a consumer point-of-view. However, a 2G iPhone would also have problems with the network operators here. Even if it were able to provide a near-3G experience (*), they have invested heavily in 3G and would be unlikely to want to subsidise a phone that goes against this grain.

        The iPhone being a bit more expensive than its rivals may not be a major handicap in itself- after all, the iPod shows that people are willing to pay a bit extra for Apple's UI design and fashionability. However, the

      • Selling a device like the iPhone in a market like Europe without 3G support is destined to failure.
        What makes you think that the Euro iPhone won't be 3G? When Jobs made the public announcement in front of thousands of developers early this year he very specifically stated that the Europen version would be 3G. Do you have some information to the contrary?
    • There was a rumor a week ago about a leaked ad for the German launch. Does anyone know if it was confirmed or (convincingly) debunked? By the way, the ad claimed November 12 launch AND 3G!

      http://files.macbidouille.com/news/200709/iphone_release_ger1.jpg [macbidouille.com]
    • by FyRE666 (263011) on Saturday September 15, 2007 @04:40PM (#20618649) Homepage
      I think it's fair to say that if Apple don't add 3G, then the iPhone will be dead in the water over here in the UK. It's pretty poor in comparison to most current phones here (as the parent mentioned, we don't have too many restrictions on the phones here; due to more competition between companies I guess) It's got a pretty poor still camera, no video, no replacable battery, and if there's no way to move files - like games, ringtones etc - on and off it via USB/Bluetooth, then it's not going to have much of an audience beyond the wide eyed "oh shiny!" gumbies that seem to buy Apple kit.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 15, 2007 @05:44AM (#20614553)
    In the middle of the night, in the middle of the night iPhone your name...

    Anyway, Mac OS X is going completely closed source - 10.4.9 [apple.com] was the last open sourced release of the base kernel/BSD toolset. InputManager plugins - i.e. the technology underlying just about every Safari plugin - have been disabled as a "security risk" in Leopard, even though any application installed as a regular executable is able to cause as much mischief. Apple's iPhone has no official SDK support, the iPods have disabled video out unless you're using an official Apple dock, and a hash in the music library on the player means 3rd party clients can't sync properly with the new iPods.

    As such, although the iPhone appeals to my desire for Apple's approach toward usability, its increasingly Microsoft-like lockin puts me off investing in any new Apple hardware or software. Come on, Apple, compete on merit, not on artificial restrictions!
    • The removal of Inputmanager plugins seems like a good idea. What little OS X malware there has been seems to feature them more often than not. But I'm with you that the closed nature of the iPhone stinks.
      • What little OS X malware there has been seems to feature them more often than not.

        What OS X malware are you talking about?

        There's been one OS X malware release in the wild, and that was a social engineering attack over AIM. The only protection against social engineering exploits is user education. You can't solve them through hardening the OS or applications (though you CAN avoid them by not training people to answer affirmatively to routine security dialogs by having as many of them as Microsoft does. Alas
    • by arivanov (12034) on Saturday September 15, 2007 @06:13AM (#20614649) Homepage
      Merit is in the eye of the beholder.

      The artificial restrictions are a definite merit as far as shareholder value and suitability for media from the perspective of the MAFIAA is concerned. Most MAFIAA members are making funny noises about going elsewhere with their wares. So, I would expect Apple to show itself as even more compliant and more determined to deliver obscene market models. They want the MAFIAA members back onboard and they do not care about the consumer in the slightest.

      • Re: (Score:1, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Merit is in the eye of the beholder.

        I was referring to merit in the eyes of the consumer. Any successful publicly traded company has pleasing its shareholders as an aim, but there are more ways to do this than simply earning more custom - you can also make it harder for existing customers to leave you.

        Most MAFIAA members are making funny noises about going elsewhere with their wares.

        Precisely, and Apple locking iPod to iTunes is nothing to do with pleasing the MPAA - it's an act of self-preservation in the

      • The artificial restrictions are a definite merit as far as shareholder value and suitability for media from the perspective of the MAFIAA is concerned.

        It's ironic that Apple should buy this unsubstantiated ranting by Big Media, though, considering that they are the single most successful example of doing something Big Media basically claimed couldn't be done for years: making a lot of money by selling legal downloads cheaply.

        Most MAFIAA members are making funny noises about going elsewhere with their wares.

        The MAFIAA have been making funny noises about a lot of things for a long time. But realistically, Apple should be their best friend right now, and they should be aggressively promoting similar services as a new distribution chan

    • Mac OS X is going completely closed source - 10.4.9 was the last open sourced release of the base kernel/BSD toolset

      That's what people were saying the last time Apple was slow getting an update out, during the Tiger release.

      If Apple doesn't support InputManager plugins, Unsanity or someone will hack them back in. Apple can't stop that because OS X is not an embedded platform, it's a general purpose operating system, based on an open systems platform, with powerful debugging tools. Unless they completely red
    • by yabos (719499)
      Hey dummy, we're only at 10.4.10, one point release past the latest kernel source. You don't even know how much the kernel changed during that time anyways. I think this is good that they keep the source one point behind because then the assholes who pirate OS X and run it on their PCs with a hacked kernel are always behind a true Mac.
      Apple has said it's going to keep releasing the source so STFU about stuff you don't know about.
  • UK pricing (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Dr. Stavros (808432) on Saturday September 15, 2007 @05:51AM (#20614577) Homepage

    No word yet on a UK pricing

    For a good first estimate, simply take the US price, and change the $ to a £ symbol.

    In the U.K., we're well accustomed to paying an awful lot more for tech goodies than do Americans. We'll complain a lot, but only to each other (or like me, on Slashdot), and nothing will get done about it.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Indecision Bob (52021)
      Indeed. At the time of writing:

      iPod Touch
      8Gb - $299 (~= £150) - £199
      16Gb - $399 (~= £200) - £269

      The US iPhone is the same price as the 16gb iTouch, so I imagine that's the price it'll be over here.
      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        Do those US prices include an equivalent of VAT?

        At the UK rate of 17.5% the difference in prices isn't quite as large:

        • 8Gb - $299 (~= £150 + 17.5% ~= £175) - £199
        • 16Gb - $399 (~= £200 + 17.5% ~= £235) - £269
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by arivanov (12034)
        Add VAT to 150 and you have 150*1.175=176.25
        Add further 10-15 pounds for compliance with the EU Electronic Waste disposal directive and you are more or less there. If it has radio (I do not know the spec) there is an extra levy for EU which will put it bang on the 199 mark.
        This is actually much better than the usual 1USD=1GBP price conversion practised by most US companies.
      • iPod US price does not include sales tax.

        iPod UK price surely includes 17.5% VAT.

        £150 + 17.5% = £176.25 (13% difference)
        £200 + 17.5% = £235.00 (11% difference)
        • As you've noted, VAT is 17.5%, all too often us Brits get charged 50% - 100% more for some items over US prices, with no valid excuse other than simply ripping us off.

          It's not going to change though because it also benefits the goverment far too much in that if the consumers are being ripped off, there's an even bigger amount for them to scrounge as tax to make up for all the shite they waste our already plentiful taxes on. Having worked for the goverment, I'm simply sickened by the billions of pounds that
          • by argent (18001)
            Having worked for the goverment, I'm simply sickened by the billions of pounds that are wasted on incompetence, ignorance and stupidity every single year.

            I've been a Windows system admin, so I can sympathize.

    • With the phone market being more competitive and generally more price sensitive in the UK, the question remains will the iphone make a dent. Handsets have a life time here of a year or less and we're very used to getting the newest handsets for free or very little. The hype here is still very high so its an interesting situation. Until the iphone the £200 handesets are all smart phones/ PDA's targeted at the business user / early adopters.

      The 3G point is very overblown. The market penetration is still
    • For a good first estimate, simply take the US price, and change the $ to a £ symbol.

      In Israel, you take the US price, and change the $ to a £ symbol, and only THEN you convert it to sheqels :P
  • What about Canada? (Score:2, Insightful)

    by ironcanuk (1022683)
    Congratulations to the UK. What about us poor Canadians? I haven't even heard a rumor about when we might get our hands on one of these little gadgets.
    • by jonwil (467024)
      You could always buy one from the USA and unlock it with the new software unlock.
    • Take this for what it's worth, but a good friend of mine that works at Rogers said they're introducing it before Christmas. Personally I think it's BS, but maybe it'll happen.
    • by ceoyoyo (59147)
      There are lots of rumors about the iPhone in Canada. As far as I know Rogers has officially said it's coming, but not sure exactly when. Some rumors say before Christmas, some say before next spring.

      Rogers has said officially that you'll be required to buy a data plan for it. Rogers data plans are EXPENSIVE. There's a petition going around for Rogers to bring the iPhone data plan in line with the rest of North America.
  • [[whether or not it will have 3G]]

    (sarcasm)Yeah, like Apple would piss off all the americans by providing a 3G iPhone to UK user first!
    (/sarcasm)

    *Sigh*
    • Yeah, like Apple would piss off all the americans by providing a 3G iPhone to UK user first!
      What is the state of 3G in the US like anyway? From what I've heard, even 2G coverage is far from complete there (to be fair, this is partly due to the much larger area of coverage required per head of population).

      I'm just guessing, but unless 3G penetration is even *close* to 2G there, it sounds like most people would have a better experience with 2G anyway.
      • This is my first "more than a phone" cellphone, my previous one had no internet browser. Just a phone and a camera. And from what I've experienced on my iPhone with a service called "Orb" that allows me to stream music over the internet from my home PC, this "2.75G" is great. I'm not downloading torrents of the latest games with it, but I can stream music (and video) just fine.
        • by jimicus (737525)
          3G in the UK hasn't been a huge success. Oh, the company "3"'s doing OK - but that's mainly through offering very cheap contracts with lots of free minutes, not because of fast internet browsing or video calling. So I don't think that's particularly crucial to the iPhone.

          What is crucial is that the UK market bears a closer resemblance to the European market than the US one. We get slightly newer, sleeker phones some of which simply never see the light of day in the US - and those that do, by the time the
    • I fear Apple's going to piss off European customers by charging the same amount of euros as dollars. 399 = $554. For that extra $155 I expect 3G to be part of the deal.
      • by tepples (727027)

        I fear Apple's going to piss off European customers by charging the same amount of euros as dollars.
        How much is VAT? (US prices are quoted excluding VAT, which varies from state to state.) How long is the minimum warranty on new goods? (In the US, it's often 90 days.) How do the environmental and RF emissions regulations differ between the US and, say, Ireland? Into how many languages must the user interface be translated?
    • Most (all?) of the UK operators have a UMTS (3G) network with almost the same coverage as their GSM networks. I don't know of any with an EDGE network, although O2 was talking about deploying one a while back. Selling a phone in the UK with only GPRS (which the iPhone would be, since EDGE won't work anywhere) doesn't sound like it makes sense.
  • ...not having all the hype again? Not that I don't appreciate just about every other article being about something with 'i' in the front of it, mind.
    • I'm so sick of that lower-case 'i' in front of every fucking product name I see. It's enough to drive someone to iMurder.
  • Operator (Score:4, Informative)

    by jaavaaguru (261551) on Saturday September 15, 2007 @06:33AM (#20614717) Homepage
    Isn't it O2?
    • It's meant to be, but it's not been confirmed yet. According to certain people, O2 is currently rolling out EDGE (I can't vouch for this though).
  • by Echemus (49002)
    According to this article [theregister.co.uk] on The Register o2 are busy upgrading their network to EDGE. The Register's suggestion that this is linked to the iPhone is a compelling one.
    • by arivanov (12034)
      There is an alternative explanation. Based on personal observations O2 and TMob are nearly up to capacity on GPRS due to the recent crackberry explosion. If you are in the morning on a UK commuter train you get nearly 90% packet loss on the downlink on GPRS. Regardless of how much they hate RIM the crackberry is the biggest sources of data revenue by far outstripping any other data product. So having the network loaded to the point where it stops working is very bad news.

      AFAIK Crackberries have been doing E
      • by arivanov (12034)
        O2 and TMob - that should be O2 and Vodafone and the last BB actually does 3G (mea culpa).
        • by fdobbie (226067)
          Actually, the latest BB is the curve (8300) and the 8800... Neither of which do 3G. You have to go back to a slightly clunkier 7xxx series model if you want UMTS (which doesn't have any of the sleek looks of the new ones, or the GPS or media functions etc).

          The Pearl doesn't have 3G either...
          • The CDMA version of the 8800 is the 8830 (Sprint/Verizon) and they support 1xEVDO which is 3G.
      • by Dogtanian (588974)
        It seems strange that the UK networks (who have invested heavily in 3G) would spend lots upgrading 2G networks to EDGE just to support a single device, even one as popular as the Blackberry. Wouldn't it make more sense for them to get RIM to develop a 3G Blackberry, or to support a 3G-enabled rival?

        And the other obvious question is that if the 2G GPRS network is overloaded with Blackberry data, wouldn't it be better to "encourage" all other device makers to use 3G instead?

        (Does EDGE actually provide muc
        • by arivanov (12034)
          Does EDGE actually provide much more capacity over standard GPRS anyway

          On average - you get 3-4 times more capacity with EDGE compared to GPRS. The investment to do this per MBit via an upgrade where applicable is only a fraction of the investment into deploying the same capacity via 3G. In addition to that if you are using dynamic channel allocation on the base station (and most operators do), deploying EDGE capacity for data frees some GSM capacity for voice.

          EDGE is no replacement for 3G, but not deploy

        • by jonbryce (703250)
          Well Blackberries don't really need high speed bandwidth, and 3G needs a lot more battery power, so maybe EDGE is a good idea from that perspective.
  • by EveryNickIsTaken (1054794) on Saturday September 15, 2007 @07:05AM (#20614839)
    Apple announces 200 GBP price drop!
  • by abigsmurf (919188) on Saturday September 15, 2007 @07:52AM (#20615023)
    I have the nagging feeling that Apple will try to clone what they did in the US in the UK ignoring the differences in the market. The UK is big on all the things the iphone can't do or does in a restrictive manner. People want to download ringtones, wallpaper and games. Picture and video messaging is something people expect from expensive phones as well, the UK is big on messaging in general. As far as I know the iphone doesn't support this kind of messaging and doesn't even notify if you've received one you can't view. Other major point is the price plan. People simply won't pay £399 and have a £30+ 18 month contract. You could get a prada phone AND an N95 for that price.
    • iPhone doesn't currently support picture-via-SMS messaging. Although I would like that feature, its lack doesn't seem to bother people all that much in the U.S. because SMS picture service *still* doesn't work reliably between different telcos. The messages sometimes go missing no matter what the handset is on either end. iPhone users send plenty of pictures via email which works no matter who you send it to and no matter if you are on same or different telcos. Presumably this feature could be added to
      • MMS (picture SMS) is the killer feature for me. I use it regularly. In fact, I hardly ever use the phone part of my phone - it's all SMS and MMS. I can live without 3G and custom ringtones (I have my phone on mute anyway), but MMS is going to be the deciding factor. I really want an iPhone. I hate my current phone (a P990i), and I've hated all phones I've ever owned to varying degrees, but no MMS (and no workaround - maybe the mail app could be used to send MMS and the browser to receive them?) kills the iP
      • by jimicus (737525)
        Although I would like that feature, its lack doesn't seem to bother people all that much in the U.S. because SMS picture service *still* doesn't work reliably between different telcos.

        Works like a charm here in the UK. I've even used it while roaming (well, I did until I discovered how much they charged me...)
    • by jonbryce (703250)
      Yes. I paid £320 for an unsubsidised IPaq with no contract, and then got a £15/month sim only contract with a very reasonable amount of minutes included.

      I guess HP, along with HTC and Blackberry are Apple's main competitors in this market.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    hurray , i can now buy a phone that has less features (no SMS, no MMS, no video calls) than my old Nokia did in 2001

    • by Don_dumb (927108)


      hurray , i can now buy a phone that has less features (no SMS, no MMS, no video calls) than my old Nokia did in 2001

      Can someone verify this? (I'm feeling really lazy today)
      If the iPhone doesn't text, it is dead in the UK. DEAD. Everyone texts here.
      I can't see that Apple would make that big a mistake here, so even if the US one doesn't, I would expect the UK one to.

      So if someone does know, please enlighten me.
      • by Laglorden (87845)
        I think it does SMS (barely, dreadfully slow I guess with no "real" buttons) but not MMS and video calls.

        "iPhone, how quaint" or "iPhone, how Amish".
        • Actually I've found the virtual keyboard to be pretty good. I can type at a pretty good clip with it now. I wouldn't let that stop you from getting one.
        • Does anyone actually USE video calling?? WHY?

          SMS works just fine. I am thinking of developing an application that sends text messages via EDGE rather than GSM so that you don't have to spend as much on text messages. I really couldn't care less about MMS since the iPhone has email (and there is now an application that lets you attach photos).
          • Yeah, I used video calling. Once. To see whether it would work.

            This is one of these features that look great on paper, and in ads, but nobody would ever use in real life. Except for phone sex, I guess.
            • by Doug Neal (195160)
              Which is pretty much how "3" pitched video calling in their ads when it was first available :)
      • From wikipedia "Text messages are presented chronologically in a mailbox format similar to Mail, which places all text from recipients together with replies. Text messages are displayed in speech bubbles (similar to iChat) under each recipient's name." It seems capable, though I've seen a comment that it's incapable of sending a message to multiple recipients, which is a bit shit. Also, speed texting on an iphone, http://youtube.com/watch?v=dU33DfFAV9w&v2 [youtube.com]
      • by Zephyr14z (907494)
        iPhone definitely texts. Everybody texts here too.
      • The iPhone does SMS just fine. In fact, its method for doing SMS is much improved over the offerings I've used from Ericsson, SonyEricsson, Nokia, and Motorola. It organizes your SMS messages into logical chats that are easy to follow. Why no one else has done this before is beyond me.

        Anyone saying the iPhone doesn't do SMS is just spreading FUD. But that's what Slashdot is for.
        • by Don_dumb (927108)
          To all replies, thank you.
          I just couldn't see that Apple would have missed that one.
        • by LKM (227954)
          My Treo did this, too. It was a great feature, until it got so slow that I had to go back to the linear listing.
    • Re: (Score:2, Flamebait)

      by iJed (594606)

      hurray , i can now buy a phone that has less features (no SMS, no MMS, no video calls) than my old Nokia did in 2001

      The iPhone does support SMS (and always has.) It also has real email (which is far more useful than MMS has ever been), a real web browser, a high-quality video player and arguably the best music player ever on a phone. It has also become very easy to install third party software [fiveforty.net] on and has a rapidly growing community of developers. Someone has even managed to implement video chat [macdaddyworld.com]!

      The iPhone

      • by Mantaman (948891)
        My nokia N95 does all this plus 3G, the screen isnt as big as an Iphone but it also has a 5 mp camera with a proper lense (carl zeiss) has an unlimited download limit with my contract (ok not realy but thats how they advertise it .. you get told off if you download more than 1gb on your phone)it does vidio calls, mms, it also has google maps (download) and GPS which if you buy the addin will do voice navigation for you. For entertainment it has an MP3 player (fairly decent) FM radio and Real player for vid
        • by RFaulder (1016762)
          The N95 is 21 mm thick, iPhone is 11.6 mm. N95 has a 5-hour GSM talk time, 3.5 CDMA. iPhone has 8 hours. N95, with 8 GB storage, is $749. With much better battery life while being an entire centimetre thinner, I choose iPhone.
          • by Mantaman (948891)
            I was commenting on UK prices .. for the Iphone to fly it HAS to compare to what is currently on the market. If you want to pay that kind of money in the US then feel free. My N95 (160mb with 2gb card) cost me £60 or $120 at current exchange rates. Do you NEED 50 days of continuous music or just a couple of hours on the way/home/at work? As for battery life I use mine for most of the day on mp3/calls etc and plug it in every night when im at home/car .. it IS a phone after all. I have found on st
      • Okay it's thicker, but it's also smaller, and although it has a smaller screen my SE K800i has all of what you list plus 3G, MMS, video calls, a 3Mp camera, a video camera, decent bluetooth with PAN, and a media player which will play iTunes+ tunes and H264 video. Okay it doesn't look as flash as the iPhone (and yes we analysed one at work which we'd bought in LA) but it was *free*.

        The primary use for my phone, apart from being a phone and occasionally media player, is providing my laptop a network when I'
        • by ben0207 (845105)
          I agree with this. I thought long and hard about the iPhone, but ultimately it's not enough of a phone for my needs (my current phone being the k810i - a refresh of the k800). No MMS was the main kicker, as I send at least 3 picture messages a day. The only thing I wish it had was WiFi, but having such good battery life makes up for it.
        • Okay it's thicker, but it's also smaller, and although it has a smaller screen my SE K800i has all of what you list plus 3G, MMS, video calls, a 3Mp camera, a video camera, decent bluetooth with PAN, and a media player which will play iTunes+ tunes and H264 video.

          I had the SE K800i. My wife has the iPhone. The SE product is VASTLY inferior, and it really shows when you use them side-by-side.

          The primary use for my phone, apart from being a phone and occasionally media player, is providing my laptop a netw

  • I expect the UK iPhone will be as horribly overpriced as the US one - expensive (and blah) handset, expensive tariff and one specific vendor. I wonder how that will work out when you can get virtually any phone for free on most tariffs in the UK. You could save so much that you could probably buy an iPod Touch and still have a pile of money left over.
  • Don't get me wrong, am an avid Apple fan when it comes to some of their products, but the lack of flexibility with the iPhone is causing me concern. I have played with an LG Prada, which while lacking the raw power of an iPhone or Nokia N95, for example, does more than people think and has a great GUI. And from the video on this CNET Review [cnet.co.uk] it looks like their new 3G equipped Viewty now fixes the flaws in the Prada and does even more, such as the cool slo mo video and a haptic touch screen. The iPhone exist
    • by Nicolay77 (258497)
      Smartphones were going to eat iPods marketshare. The iPhone is the response to this. Now iPhones are the ones eating iPods marketshare, so no lose for Apple.

      Selecting another smartphone or another MP3 player based on merits is simply the best choice.
  • by Coraon (1080675)
    Finally the world knows the truth, that Canada is the tortuga if the internet! So come americans, come up here and buy your drugs at discounted prices, get your gay relitives married, use our web cafes to dowload warez, its the one stop shopping trip for all that your goverment and the corps that control it wont let you do!
  • by houghi (78078) on Saturday September 15, 2007 @12:55PM (#20617011)
    In Belgium locking phones is illegal. That would mean that there won't be a single operator who can get an exclusive deal. That would mean everybody would be able to buy it and use it anywhere in the world.

    Also it means that the price will be the price for the phone and only for the phone.
    • Re: (Score:1, Flamebait)

      by Reaperducer (871695)

      In Belgium locking phones is illegal. That would mean that there won't be a single operator who can get an exclusive deal. That would mean everybody would be able to buy it and use it anywhere in the world. Also it means that the price will be the price for the phone and only for the phone.
      Or it could mean Belgium doesn't get the iPhone.

      In spite of Brussels' inflated view of itself, when you're a global company losing Belgium is no big deal.
  • I seriously doubt Apple with do 3G first in Europe. I suspect if they did it would put a wet blanket on US sales. Some/most US buyers would wait for the 3G model. Some have suggested that they will announce 3G and also a 3G phone. That to me makes no sense, it too close to the follow on to the original iPhone and I think Apple, with its price drop, is pretty much fixed for the Christmas selling season. I would then expect a new 3G 16GB phone in January (you know, this happens all the time with electron
  • Argh, I just can't understand how some people can be so interested about anything concerning iPhone: I'm looking at you Slashdot editors, bloggers, telecom journalist etc.. The iPhone basically is just like the Ericsson R380s [mobile-review.com], but with newer components. Just look at the thing, it's very much like iPhone. Actually it follows same concept as the iPhone: it's completely locked down, so no addable software, and it was designated to mainly function with the network. According to a Swed who I had a pleasure to me

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