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Apple Businesses

Apple Ships 8-Core MacPro 628

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the way-more-cores-than-the-earth dept.
ivan1024 writes "The Apple website is announcing the availability of an 8-core Mac Pro. The machine will ship with two 3.0 GHz Quad-Core Intel Xeon 5300 processors. Older models with the Dual-Core chips remain available. Base model with two 3.0 GHz Quad-Core Xeon processors start at $3997, (albeit with unacceptably minimal RAM or HD space; fully spec'd with dual 30" monitors and tons o' RAM/HD still over $10K... bummer)"
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Apple Ships 8-Core MacPro

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  • by k2enemy (555744) on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @08:58AM (#18604149)
    I was really hoping there would be price drops on the quad core configurations. Or at least upgraded video cards.
  • Quick Mac Buying Tip (Score:4, Informative)

    by Paulrothrock (685079) on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @08:59AM (#18604171) Homepage Journal

    Never buy anything from Apple that you can't install yourself. For the Mac Pro, Apple charges $700 for 4GB (4x1GB) of RAM. You can get the same amount of RAM from DealRam [dealnews.com] for $500. The same goes for hard drives. Apple charges you $329 for a 500GB SATA drive, which you can get from NewEgg for around $200. [newegg.com] Granted, these aren't covered by your warranty, but they often have a manufacturer's warranty

    I've often though the lack of user serviceable parts in the Mac Mini was designed to sell more RAM at Apple's hugely inflated prices.

  • Re:Advantage? (Score:5, Informative)

    by kalidasa (577403) on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @09:05AM (#18604251) Journal
    The front end is usually Avid or Apple software - and the Apple software only runs on OS X, and the Avid software can run on OS X. Linux boxes are often used for rendering farms. IRIX? Didn't SGI just discontinue IRIX?
  • a good chunk... (Score:3, Informative)

    by Animaether (411575) on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @09:08AM (#18604305) Journal
    ...but they hardly own it. For one, they're still missing a killer 3D app. Yes, Maya is on the Mac - but you'll be hard-pressed to find many companies using Maya on said Mac. Nevermind that it's not an Apple app (unlike Shake (by acquisition), FCP, Logic Pro (by acquisition) etc.) If Autodesk hadn't grabbed it up, I would have expected Apple to do so.

    Similarly, for editing/post, there's a ton of flint/flame/inferno/etc./etc. out there which are nowhere near Apple.

    And that's completely ignoring everything hardware that you'll find in a typical broadcast facility. Avid, Thomson/Grass Valley, et al would have a chuckle at your post. So would Apple, for that matter - Apple isn't interested in replacing them at all... they're more on the software side and helping to sell Apple hardware.
  • by sogoodsofarsowhat (662830) on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @09:10AM (#18604333)
    Funny the 4 mac minis i own i have upgraded all the ram myself. Maybe its just you who cannot seem to figure out how to upgrade the ram. I mean there are wholes site on the internet devoted to this. BTW...I can buy ram cheaper online then from dell. What is your point?
  • Re:awesome machine (Score:2, Informative)

    by Gr8Apes (679165) on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @09:16AM (#18604445)
    Pretty much any heavy developer work can benefit from such a system. When you're running databases, messaging applications, appservers, webservers, clients, etc, it can add processes quickly, not to mention the DB alone could use all 8 cores.
  • Re:Advantage? (Score:3, Informative)

    by Pahroza (24427) on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @09:18AM (#18604515)
    From the beginning of the year, but still an interesting read:

    Adobe and the Multi-threaded Client

    http://www.illuminata.com/perspectives/?p=251 [illuminata.com]
  • Correction: (Score:1, Informative)

    by DJCacophony (832334) <v0dkaNO@SPAMmyg0t.com> on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @09:30AM (#18604733) Homepage
    The de facto video editing app for professionals these days is Adobe Premiere. In fact, since Adobe Creative Suite 3 has support for universal binaries, the latest iteration of Premiere will be again be available on OSX.
  • USA only? (Score:4, Informative)

    by Andy_R (114137) on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @09:30AM (#18604741) Homepage Journal
    No sign of 8-core machines in the UK Apple Store [apple.com]. Just a glitch or are we going to have to wait a bit longer over here? Lets hope Apple doesn't make us wait as long for their 8-core machine as Sony did for theirs (the PS3).
  • by LoudMusic (199347) on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @09:45AM (#18604989)

    "The Apple website is announcing the availability of an 8-core Mac Pro. The machine will ship with two 3.0 GHz Quad-Core Intel Xeon 5300 processors. Older models with the Dual-Core chips remain available. Base model with two 3.0 GHz Quad-Core Xeon processors start at $3997, (albeit with unacceptably minimal RAM or HD space; fully spec'd with dual 30" monitors and tons o' RAM/HD still over $10K... bummer)"
    I know I'm redundant on this one but ...

    You've got $3,600 in displays alone - that's more than 1/3 of the price. Also, Apple is notorious for overpricing hard drives and memory. Buy the fastest CPUs and get everything else from someone else, including the displays (get'em from Dell), and you'll save 20%+.
  • by Frumious Wombat (845680) on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @09:45AM (#18604991)
    Remeber the Pros, like the XServes, take ECC RAM. No matter who you buy it from, it isn't cheap. Apple's price for the Pro isn't much more than (~$140 at this point), than decent third-party RAM. (4 1GB ECC from Crucial is $560, 2x2GB is $840) The HD's may be more comparable, but check access time, cache size, and warranty.

    The only hard part about upgrading the RAM in a mini is not panicking at the plastic-popping sounds you get when you crack the case. Two sharpened putty knives (or lab spatulas), and you're golden. I did the memory and added wireless to mine at the same time, and I'm typing on it now, six months later. The mini is designed like apple's DRM; it prevents the casual tinkerer from getting inside of it, voiding their warranty, then having a fit on the phone.
  • by coyotl (415332) <coyoteNO@SPAMlenscraft.com> on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @09:54AM (#18605171) Homepage
    Note that RAM and drives purchased from Apple are covered by their extended 3-year warranty. (And I always buy this... it's worth the peace-of-mind.)
  • by tm2b (42473) on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @09:55AM (#18605199) Journal

    Well, it voids the warranty, which most people try to avoid.
    Christ, wtf is wrong with people? We went over this when the mini was first released, and we have to go over this every time it's brought up.

    No. Installing memory in a Mac Mini does not void the warranty. [macworld.com]
  • by tm2b (42473) on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @10:01AM (#18605339) Journal

    The mini is designed like apple's DRM; it prevents the casual tinkerer from getting inside of it, voiding their warranty, then having a fit on the phone.
    Getting pretty tired of this lie. Opening the mini's case (to install memory) does not void the warranty. [macworld.com]
  • by carambola5 (456983) on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @10:07AM (#18605493) Homepage
    Here's another tip.

    Look at Apple's "Select Developer Membership." At the base configuration, the difference between (ADC Select Membership + Mac Pro w/ discount) and (Mac Pro w/o discount) is $1... in favor of the membership. Bumping up the Mac Pro to the 8-core version yields $300 savings (ie: $800 savings - $500 membership). Plus you get everything that comes with the membership, including the Leopard Early Start Kit and two free tech support incidents.

    If you're a student, the membership price drops from $500 to $100, though you're only allowed to use the hardware discount once ever, whereas the Select Membership lets you buy hardware with the discount once per year (at a price of $500/year).
  • Re:Correction: (Score:4, Informative)

    by anagama (611277) <obamaisaneocon@nothingchanged.org> on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @10:22AM (#18605835) Homepage
    acrobat
  • by Faust7 (314817) on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @10:33AM (#18606091) Homepage
    Yes, Maya is on the Mac - but you'll be hard-pressed to find many companies using Maya on said Mac.

    http://72.14.209.104/search?q=cache:pfgF8E0i5C8J:w ww.macworld.co.uk/news/index.cfm%3FNewsID%3D14619+ macworld+maya+mac+sales+autodesk&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd= 1&gl=us [72.14.209.104]

    20% of Maya sales are the Mac version, according to Autodesk. (Google cache since Macworld UK is apparently down.)

  • Re:Advantage? (Score:3, Informative)

    by Altus (1034) on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @10:41AM (#18606255) Homepage

    plenty of shops run avid systems on macs. Admitedly a lot of the large scale newsroom stuff is currently only on windows but all of that is fairly new. Stand alone editors (as used in TV show and movie editing) can be done just as easily on an avid PC as an avid mac.

    Im not sure exactly what the breakdown is right now out in the field but these things are just fine for running Media composer and editing up your latest blockbuster movie (although I'm not sure if these actual machines have yet been certified by avid)
  • Re:Correction: (Score:5, Informative)

    by Nimey (114278) on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @10:42AM (#18606263) Homepage Journal
    Requiring admin privs for their software to run. Dmitri Sklyarov. Making Acrobat Reader bloated and slow.
  • Re:Advantage? (Score:5, Informative)

    by Farmer Tim (530755) <roundfile@NospaM.mindless.com> on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @10:48AM (#18606399) Journal
    4d? Are you sending your rendered images into the past, or the future?

    CG animation uses a timeline as well as three dimensional coordinates, so 4d is technically correct.
  • Re:Advantage? (Score:5, Informative)

    by spooje (582773) <spooje&hotmail,com> on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @11:06AM (#18606737) Homepage

    Premiere? Well first off, it is available [adobe.com]for the Mac, secondly Adobe stopped making it for the Mac for a while because Premeire has always been a low-end program for prosumers and multimedia professionals.

    Only low end shops use Final Cut? So do you consider:

    The BBC

    CNN

    David Fincher

    The Washington Post

    Pixar

    Weta

    ILM small shops? Cold Mountain and Lost in Translation were cut solely on Final Cut Pro, and for compositing tools don't forget Shake is what Weta used to make the Lord of the Rings movies and King Kong.

  • Re:DAMNIT! (Score:5, Informative)

    by 47Ronin (39566) <glenn.47ronin@com> on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @11:17AM (#18606909) Homepage
    You have 14 days to exchange the machine for the newer one at an Apple Store and pay just a restocking fee. Better get on it!
  • Re:Advantage? (Score:2, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @11:19AM (#18606945)
    Symphony high end? The output from FCP is better these days. We run Flint/Smoke, Symphony, Media Composer, FCP, Editbox and DS Nitris here. You'd be surprised how much FCP can do - it craps on the others for file and format IO, for example, and the MacPro is a shit-hot workstation, better than the typical HP xw8400 that those WIndows and Linux apps run on.
  • Re:Advantage? (Score:3, Informative)

    by Lumpy (12016) on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @11:27AM (#18607079) Homepage
    add to that Comedy Central and CBS.

    Both have a huge number of FCP editors.
  • by 99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @11:56AM (#18607585)

    ...in hopes that they would finally offer a more "standard" RAM and hopefully a 8k Nvidia card. (This mac uses weird slow RAM that is very expensive

    Every machine running this generation of Xeon processors needs the type of RAM Apple uses and calling it "slow" does not really help your credibility here.

    I thought it "might" be possible to upgrade the video card myself, but found out you can't do that.

    Umm, you can't? Since when? You've been able to swap the video cards in Apple's towers for about 8-10 years now.

    It makes little to no sense to me that Apple chose to not use the same freaking graphics cards as a standard PC.

    Apple uses standard video cards, but as usual are a little ahead of the curve. Not all cards support EFI yet, since Vista is the first version of Windows to support it on the desktop properly. You're probably one of those people who complained about Apple's nonstandard choice of using USB for keyboards and mice instead of PS/2. Now many years later the bottom end of the PC market is finally catching up but my 8 year old mac is still working fine because they included USB and firewire instead of what was "standard" at the time.

    Apple, you almost had a Windows/Linux user switched, but your RAM and Video card selection lost you one.

    Personally, I'm glad Apple is forward looking and pushes current standards instead of decade old ones. If they lose a few sales from people who can't wait 6 moths for the Windows crowd to play catch up and for more widespread support from third party vendors, I think it is a small loss.

  • Re:Advantage? (Score:2, Informative)

    by t35t0r (751958) on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @12:01PM (#18607659)
    dell has had dual quad core systems = 8p for several months. see their precision workstation line up. it just never made it to the front of /. . The only thing related to dell that makes it to /. is when they get sued by some customer or when they decide to start selling preconfigured linux boxes to regular desktop customers (not enterprise). basically if it's not not linux or apple or any company that mass markets linux products to consumers then it should be shot down.
  • Re:a good chunk... (Score:5, Informative)

    by p7 (245321) on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @12:17PM (#18607959)
    Sorry, bud... But if this is a design house, I hope they have someone that can spend their time sourcing parts. If it is a freelancer spec'ing out their own machine, they are doing themselves a disservice by not spending an hour looking around for alternatives. Just to point out how bad the price gouging is...

    Apple 16GB (8x2GB) FB-DIMM 667 $4499
    Newegg 16GB (8x2GB) Kingston (KVR667D2D8F5/1G) FB-DIMM 667 $2392

    Apple 750GB SATA 3GB/s $$499
    ZipZoomFly ST3750640NS 750GB Serial ATA 3Gb/s $299

    Apple Warranty 1 Year

    Seagate HD Warranty 5 Years
    Kingston Memory Lifetime Warranty

    So at the least buy a bare bones Mac Pro and add your own parts, you will save a ton.
  • by Kjella (173770) on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @01:12PM (#18608967) Homepage
    t seems you are under the mistaken impression that you can't drop any old modern nVidia PCI-E video card in a Mac.

    Considering I find half a kazillion posts about said video cards not working under OS X, and the few that do need to use some beta driver from here [macvidia.com] and any new graphics cards will be a hit-or-miss thing too because the PC cards lack EFI support, yes I'm under that "mistaken impression". If you got any sources to back up your claims, I'd love to see them.
  • by be-fan (61476) on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @01:12PM (#18608975)
    An 8-core 2.67 GHz model from Dell runs $4907 with no monitor. For roughly the same price, you can get a Mac Pro with 8-cores at 3.0 GHz, 4 GB of FB-DIMM RAM (4x as much as on the Dell), 500 GB SATA disk (2x as much as on the Dell), and a pair of 7300GT graphics cards.
  • by Draconix (653959) on Wednesday April 04, 2007 @05:16PM (#18612869)
    It's still gouging, but not as bad as you think. In order to keep the Mac Pro from sounding like a Jumbo Jet, Apple made its own standard for heat sinks on DDR2 667 RAM. If you get DDR2 667 with normal heat sinks, it won't be able to lose heat fast enough under normal conditions, and will have errors. This isn't FUD, I'd been planning to get a Mac Pro for weeks (just ordered one, too; dual core 3 Ghz) and studied up on the RAM. Any RAM not using the better heat sinks has been tending to cause problems in Mac Pros. If you google it, you will find plenty of accounts of RAM not up to the standard Apple set failing in Mac Pros. However, you can (as I am doing) get 3rd party RAM with adequate heat sinks for reasonably decent prices. Just look around for "Mac Pro RAM" and you'll eventually find stuff that's been tried and tested, but isn't expensive. I found a place I can get 4 GB for less than $500, so I'm happy.

    Getting the right RAM 3rd party is a smarter buy than getting it from Apple, but make sure you get the right RAM!

    Again, from what I've seen, _be very careful_ getting RAM for the Mac Pro. Make sure it's been thoroughly tested first and had no problems before getting any given brand, and without the proper heat sinks, it seems like you're going to get slowdowns of the RAM and dramatic increases in the use of fans in the Mac Pro. (From what I've seen, though, it's more likely to have errors than just do that, unfortunately.)

    Then again, you could probably get away with standard heat sinks if you know how to tweak the fans to run fast enough to keep them from going wonky.

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