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iPod Most Popular Music Player on Microsoft Campus 1017

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the along-with-everywhere-else dept.
bblazer writes "Wired is running an article about how despite the displeasure of management, the iPod is the most popular music player on the Microsoft campus. The article states that 80% of those who have digital music players have an iPod. Employees have even started using different headphones to be a bit more stealthy about it."
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iPod Most Popular Music Player on Microsoft Campus

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  • I wonder... (Score:3, Interesting)

    by BigDogCH (760290) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @12:05PM (#11551705) Journal
    I wonder if Microsoft employees use a disproportionately large number of MACs, or are more likely to be Firefox users. I mean, fast food workers never want to eat where they have worked, and people who work at many factories refuse to buy products from that factory. Maybe they feel hatred towards their employer.
    • Re:I wonder... (Score:5, Insightful)

      by SpottedKuh (855161) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @12:26PM (#11551986)
      [F]ast food workers never want to eat where they have worked.

      I have never worked in fast food, but I have worked in the food-preparation industry. And I can say that I am leery about eating anything from my former employer; and, it has nothing to do with hatred toward my employer. While it was only a summer job to get me through my first year of university, I had an excellent employer and the pay was good. Unfortunately, I saw the kind of sanitation practices that took place during the preparation of food (including, for example, people touching food with licked fingers).

      [P]eople who work at many factories refuse to buy products from that factory.

      This time I speak not from my own experience, but from that of a good friend of mine who worked at a pipe-fitting factory. While the factory and its management had strict safety protocols (regarding both its employees and its finished products), most employees blatently disregarded those protocols. Many close calls (including falling pipes barely missing people and chemical spills being sealed just in time) resulted from the lax attitude of most employees toward those protocols. More important for the consumer, though, many employees tried to slack off as much as possible, resulting in many pipes that were cracked or otherwise unusable, but were only discovered during the final phase of product quality checks. Arguably, with such an attitude prevalent, some faulty products must make it out of the factory. Hence, I would understand anyone's unease at buying from such a factory after seeing first hand (or, in my case, hearing second-hand) about the safety violations.

      Of course, one could argue that such issues would exist at almost any factory or any fast food restaurant (or, almost anywhere, quite frankly), but I suppose something about our perception of a particular location changes after having experienced the issues up close.
    • Re:I wonder... (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Quasar1999 (520073) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @12:31PM (#11552047) Journal
      No... Fast food workers refuse to eat where they work for 2 reasons, first they know what goes in the food (scary stuff), and second they are sick of the taste and smell of it.

      Factory workers on the other hand... well, let's break that up, those who work in factories that produce foods, they once again see what goes into it... (that's very scary stuff, I've seen what goes into most cookies and crackers... most of the ingredients are also found in windex...) Now as for the other group, they simply know the flaws in the products their factory produces...

      In the case of Microsoft, their employees tried their product, found it inferior, and moved on. Don't forget, MS is a huge company, and you'll note the article specifically mentions that the media group is all using MS based players... that's probably due to fear of losing your job, rather than thinking your product is superior... but anyways...

      What I'm trying to get at, is that the don't feel hatred to their employeers as the parent tried to imply, they simply know a little too much about the product produced...
      • Re:I wonder... (Score:5, Informative)

        by NaruVonWilkins (844204) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @01:32PM (#11552837)
        Excuse me - I'm in the media group, and the only people I know of on my team who have a portable media player have an iPod. In fact, some of the people who work on portable devices have an iPod. I can't speculate as to the reason, but I will point out that Apple is still ahead of the curve in releases. Sure, you can find a little Samsung device that has the same features as the Mini, but it's hard to find. Apple has their own store, and they're a much more recognized brand.
      • Re:I wonder... (Score:4, Interesting)

        by JudgeFurious (455868) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @07:37PM (#11557279)
        In high school I spent about a three years working in fast food and it made a distinct impression on me. I worked at Popeye's, then McDonalds, and finally Chick-Fil-A and the only one of the three I'll go anywhere near now is Chick-Fil-A.

        The one I worked in was fanatically spotless. I don't know if it's all of them but a great many are owned by Uber-Christian franchise owners who are crazy about the clean and the lord. I didn't fit in with the majority of the crew there being a godless heathen and all but I'll give them points for being obsessively clean.

        I don't even want to think about, much less mention what I saw at Popeye's and McDonalds. I've tried hard to black those months out of my mind.
    • Re:I wonder... (Score:5, Informative)

      by soft_guy (534437) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @12:38PM (#11552134)
      I wonder if Microsoft employees use a disproportionately large number of MACs, or are more likely to be Firefox users.

      No, they are not disproportionately Macintosh users compared to the rest of the software industry (unless they work for MacBU). No, they do not hate their employer. No, they are not more likely to use Firefox compared to other software professionals at other companies.

      I base this on having worked there in the past.
  • by Gob Blesh It (847837) <gobblesh1t@gmail.com> on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @12:05PM (#11551707)
    The Microsoft employee's open letter to Bill Gates [weblogs.com] almost made me choke. In case you haven't read it, let me paraphrase: "How do we make an iPod killer?" he asks rhetorically. "First we must harness the blogosphere!" he answers. "Then we'll design the interface by committee. Synergize, baby."

    Anyway, I found it interesting how clearly the note reveals (what seems to be) Microsoft's general thought process. Never lead, always follow. I mean, how pathetic is this sort of blatant, shameless me-tooism? While innovators like Apple are trying to build the future, Microsoft employees like this guy are trying desperately to catch up... and they still can't figure out how.

    Just my two cents from an Apple fanboy. Flame on...
    • by eln (21727) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @12:13PM (#11551801) Homepage
      Well, while your characterization of Apple as a ceaseless innovator may be a little over the top, you do have a point about Microsoft, one that demonstrates the dangers inherent in a monopoly or oligopoly controlled industry.

      Microsoft doesn't innovate because they don't NEED to innovate. They know that they can be late to the party on a particular feature or product, and they will still be able to capture the majority of the market, because they can offer two things that no one else can possibly provide:
      1.) the strength of the Microsoft name, and
      2.) Seamless integration with Windows, a family of operating systems that over 90% of the public uses, and which only one company has full access to the internals of: Microsoft.

      If the innovation does not fit into a category that can be exploited in this way, Microsoft can either purchase and rebrand the technology, or develop their own clones and bury the competition in predatory pricing and overwhelming marketing.

      Why bother to innovate when it's so much easier not to?
      • by HeghmoH (13204) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @12:46PM (#11552227) Homepage Journal
        Seamless integration with Windows, a family of operating systems that over 90% of the public uses, and which only one company has full access to the internals of: Microsoft.

        Hah! Windows doesn't even seamlessly integrate with itself, much less external products. Microsoft wouldn't know seamless integration if it hit them over the head while crying out, "Hello! I am seamless integration!"

        Of course, they can pretend, which convinces most people.
    • by Geekenstein (199041) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @12:13PM (#11551802)
      Being a copycat has always been a strategic business move. Let some other company develop a product, spend countless revisions figuring out what doesn't work, have lots of expensive bombs and R&D costs. Then you simply make a cheaper version of the sucessful product without comitting your own resources to forging the path.

      That, my friend, is known as smart business.

      Need an example? Here's a quick one. Tivo and the satellite/cable PVRs. The content providers can do it cheaper, because they don't have those large R&D bills. Tivo, on the other hand, has to produce the product, pay the expenses incurred, and still somehow make a profit.

      The innovator is usually the one who ends up going out of business. Apple is (currently) the exception.
      • by Mr. Underbridge (666784) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @12:42PM (#11552183)
        The innovator is usually the one who ends up going out of business. Apple is (currently) the exception.

        I don't think Apple does much innovation of that kind anymore. They seem to have taken another track to the typical "lead, follow, or..." paradigm: taking something that exists, and making it cool. Did they invent the portable music player? No, they made it cool and really usable.

        Also, just to nitpick: TiVo supplies DirecTV's PVRs. I think TiVo is here to stay. But I realize you could have picked 1000 other examples that supported your thesis.

        • TiVo may be a dead duck soon. DirecTV did not renew their contract with them. Their chairman and president just bolted. His example does support his thesis.
      • by PCM2 (4486) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @12:47PM (#11552234) Homepage
        Could it be ... could it be you've come up with a worthwhile reason why we have patents?
      • I think you're being a little hard on Microsoft (whom I am not a big fan of and generally don't use their products.) While MS always seems to be holding the gun as the one coming up with the knock-off, it is a fact of life that in every industry a new product is either covered in patents (which have their own evils) or quickly reproduced.

        In fashion, it goes like this:
        1) Armani/Gucci/whomever releases new jeans that are actually worn to the point of looking stained.
        2) Next year, Levi's adds this to their li
      • by eclectic4 (665330) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @01:09PM (#11552505)
        "The innovator is usually the one who ends up going out of business. Apple is (currently) the exception."

        Yes, that beleaguered company should be going out of business any decade now, I can feel it...
    • So apple invented the hard drive based mp3 player? Holy crap, that's amazing.

      You got served.
      • by Leo McGarry (843676) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @12:35PM (#11552094)
        So apple invented the hard drive based mp3 player?

        Basically, yeah.

        You know who invented the automobile? Depending on how you define the term, there are as many as half a dozen possible answers, none of them later than 1893.

        But do you know who really invented the automobile, for all practical purposes? That's right. Henry Ford, in 1908.

        Apple is to the iPod as Henry Ford is to the car.
        • The automobile was invented by Mr. Daihmler in Germany.

          Henry Ford invented the assembly-line which made mass-production of automobiles possibles.

          That is, if you wanted one in black.

          Apple did not invent the MP3 player.

          Apple mass-marketed an MP3 player that looekd good, was easy to use, and had the features consumers were craving.

          And no, the iPod doesn't *just* work with the iTMS.

          I use mine regularly with sites such as eMusic, Magnatunes, and other MP3 sites. iTunes likes those files just fine.
        • by gstoddart (321705) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @01:20PM (#11552647) Homepage
          So apple invented the hard drive based mp3 player?

          Basically, yeah.


          Apple had the first widespread success with one, but I seem to remember things like the Creative Nomad predating it by a matter of years, so completely untrue.

          You know who invented the automobile? Depending on how you define the term, there are as many as half a dozen possible answers, none of them later than 1893.


          But do you know who really invented the automobile, for all practical purposes? That's right. Henry Ford, in 1908.
          nobody. Ford was the first to mass produce 'em. There's a huge difference.

          Apple is to the iPod as Henry Ford is to the car.


          Well, "Apple is to the portable MP3 player what Henry Ford was to the car" might be closer to accurate. You've rather overmixed your metaphors and created a bit of a mish-mash.

      • Any moron can invent an MP3 player. Just look at all the cheapjack no-name players from Asia.

        It takes an Apple to invent a better MP3 player -- one that's so easy to use, all you have to do is plug it into your computer and it essentially does everything else.

        That is why the iPod is a raging success.
      • by jsebrech (525647) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @01:41PM (#11553007)
        Apple invented the hard drive based consumer mp3 player. Before that the only people with HD-based mp3 players were geeks or early adopters, with players that catered to that crowd (advanced recording features, large physical dimensions to afford large disk sizes, extra geek stuff like ethernet interfaces, ...). The ipod made it possible to give your mom an mp3 player and have her make use of it with minimal guidance. This is because the entire "ipod experience" (and I know that's a laden term) fits together smoothly, from the first time you turn it on, over how you use itunes to put music on there, to actually putting on an album during daily use. There are no "tricks" you need to figure out. It all just works. This is incidentally why the windows ipod market didn't really take off until itunes became available on windows. The software before that was so horrible my mind has blanked out its name. Ah, yes, now I remember, musicmatch, which was anything but. *shivers*

        I have yet to see another HD-based mp3 player that has the entire package: a good player UI, good PC music management software, and an easy way to get almost any sort of music legally from the internet.
    • by shut_up_man (450725) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @01:00PM (#11552391) Homepage
      This reminds me of an analogy that I read somewhere, perhaps from Robert X Cringely... it said there are three types of tech companies:

      1) The Commandos
      These guys are doing crazy new stuff in wacky situations, inventing and improvising and breaking new ground. They are happiest going where no-one has gone before, creating new products and whole new markets. If they aren't doing wild new stuff, they get bored and go somewhere else. In many ways, this is Apple.

      2) The Soldiers
      Soldiers go in once markets and products have been established by the commandos. They take these original ideas and solidify them, securing the area with polish and marketing glitz. In many ways, this is Microsoft.

      3) The Police
      Once the war is won, the Police maintain the status quo. They aren't interested in creating markets or inventing new products, they just want things to say the same and keep making cash for their organization. In many ways, this is Dell.

      Now I can see holes in these descriptions already, but I do get the feeling that Microsoft isn't in the insanely great new product business. It's risky, requires rare and volatile skills, and it doesn't end up making that much money in the long run. And that last point is the key, because Microsoft really isn't a tech company. They are a money company. They make tonnes and tonnes of money, and they don't care about the other stuff.
  • Huh? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by JamesD_UK (721413) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @12:06PM (#11551712) Homepage
    Why is this particularly interesting? Should they should be using a digital portable music player made by Microsoft instead of Apple?

    The iPod is the most popular digital music player. It's fairly like that if you take any subset of the population that the iPod will also be their most popular player.

    • Re:Huh? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by colanut (541823) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @12:17PM (#11551852) Homepage
      It is interesting because (from the goddamn article):
      So popular is the iPod, executives are increasingly sending out memos frowning on its use.
      Microsoft doesn't currently make hardware, but the sure as hell make a competing media format. Balmer and co have made a lot of noise about the iPod as well. But the point is, how can you make an Apple killer if your own employees are using the competition.
  • headphones (Score:4, Informative)

    by Darth_brooks (180756) <clipper377@nOSPAm.gmail.com> on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @12:06PM (#11551714) Homepage
    Employees have even started using different headphones to be a bit more stealthy about it.

    Could be, or maybe they just don't want to get mugged. White iPod headphone do a great job of saying "I've got an expensive, easy to steal piece of electronics on me."

    Also, iPod headphones suck. after half an hour my ears started hurting with the old ones.
    • by gotgenes (785704) <chris.lasher@NoSPAm.gmail.com> on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @12:12PM (#11551797) Homepage

      Could be, or maybe they just don't want to get mugged. White iPod headphone do a great job of saying "I've got an expensive, easy to steal piece of electronics on me."

      Exactly! 'Cause I know I certainly keep hearing about these muggings that happen to all these people wearing iPods in upper-middle class neighborhoods, schools, universities, and especially large, patrolled software giant campuses.

      ...

  • Could it be (Score:4, Funny)

    by CDOS_CDOS run (669823) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @12:06PM (#11551715)
    Can you imagine people using the most popular product of it's kind?? I bet many of them drive HONDAS too!!!! What will Bill do?? Micorsoft doesn't compete with Apples Ipod, why would anyone at Microsoft care?
  • Straight from the article:
    But at the Windows Digital Media Group, which is charged with software for portable players and the WMA format, using an iPod is not a good career move.

    "In the media group they all smoke the company dope on that one," the manager said.


    So a Microsoft manager is comparing their own products to mind-altering substances? I won't dispute that!

  • by Pirogoeth (662083) <mailbox@ik r u g .com> on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @12:06PM (#11551717) Homepage Journal
    Quick! Put that thing away!
  • by Zemplar (764598) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @12:07PM (#11551733) Journal
    Here you have it folks. Not everyone at Microsoft is hatching ill-conceived ideas; apparently it's only the Management.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @12:09PM (#11551755)
    MS has an unsecured network for test projects - a little bird told me that when launching iTunes on this unsecured network (from within the MS campus) you can see dozens, if not hundreds of shared iTunes libraries--all being shared by Rendezvous.
    • by Queer Boy (451309) <`dragon.76' `at' `mac.com'> on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @12:52PM (#11552295)
      when launching iTunes on this unsecured network (from within the MS campus) you can see dozens, if not hundreds of shared iTunes libraries--all being shared by Rendezvous.

      Microserfs have stated quite a few times that the Macintosh Business Unit (MacBU) is one of their most profitable divisions. They do little to no advertising for Microsoft Office on Macintosh and most of the innovations for the Windows version of Office are created by the MacBU, being implemented in the Mac version of Office first. Does the Windows version of Word have Notebook view yet?

      I'm not at all suprised that you would find a horde of iTunes shared libraries when they have a pretty healthy team working on a profitable product.

  • by kneecarrot (646291) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @12:10PM (#11551769)
    I actually work for Microsoft (gasp! and I also read Slashdot!). My cube-mate owns an iPod. I remember the week after MSN Music was launched, he took his iPod with him into the cafeteria. He was waiting in line to grab his lunch and noticed that people kept cutting in front of him in line. He couldn't figure out what the heck was going on until he realized the people cutting in front were all from the music division. They had seen the white earphones and were "punishing" him for going with the competitor.
    Sometimes people can be very petty here.
  • by winkydink (650484) * <sv.dude@gmail.com> on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @12:12PM (#11551792) Homepage Journal
    A 40Gb writable device that easily attaches to one's computer.
    • by lysium (644252) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @12:51PM (#11552284)
      Unlike you, Microsoft knows the full power of Group Policies, and how the entire network can be configured to deny installation of external devices. Resorting to imperfect physical security would only annoy employees while failing to protect against cursory concealment techniques.
  • by savagedome (742194) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @12:16PM (#11551842)
    The way Steve looked at it, this iPod was your birthright. He'd be damned if any of the slopes were gonna get their greasy yellow hands on his boy's birthright. So he hid it in the one place he knew he could hide something: his ass. Five long months, he wore this iPod up his ass and disguised himself on the Microsoft campus. Then when he left because of dysentery, he gave me the iPod. I hid this uncomfortable piece of metal up my ass for two more months. Then, after seven months, I was sent home to my family. And now, little man, I give the iPod to you.

    Make sure the wire coming out of the headphone jack is not too thick. Sometimes it hurts but I can tell you that once you use iPod, you will never go back.

    With apologies to Mr.Tarantino
  • by sootman (158191) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @12:17PM (#11551867) Homepage Journal
    Robert Scoble--one of the people mentioned in the article--has already written [weblogs.com] about it. "Personally there's no way that 80% of our employees own an MP3 player. I don't know what world that source is living in, but it's not the one I live in... the story is a non-starter. I know a lot of Apple employees who play Halo 2 too. Is that a story?"

    Ed Bott has some good comments [edbott.com] too: "Now read the story. Read it carefully.... Note that the entire thingis based on an interview with one "high-level [Microsoft] manager who asked to remain anonymous." From this one source, we are able to calculate with confidence that 16,000 employees at Microsoft's Redmond campus own iPods... taking an offhand remark from an unknown source (who may or may not have a hidden agenda and who may or may not know what he's talking about) and extrapolating it to the entire campus is just silly...
    One thing they teach you in Journalism 101 is that when you have a single anonymous source, you don't have a story. That's still true."
    • Robert Scoble--one of the people mentioned in the article--has already written about it. "Personally there's no way that 80% of our employees own an MP3 player. I don't know what world that source is living in, but it's not the one I live in...

      He went on to state, "Personally there's no way that 80% of our employees use more than 640k of ram. I don't know what world that source is living in, but it's not the one I live in..."

      Because, after all, if someone at Microsoft doesn't recognise people's usage pat
    • I know a lot of Apple employees who play Halo 2 too. Is that a story?

      No, Apple employees playing Halo 2 is not a story, since Apple doesn't make anything to remotely compete with Halo 2, a video game only available on Microsoft's Xbox platform.

      If however, Apple employees were buying Windows PCs in order to play Halo (the original) which has been ported to OS X [apple.com] then that _would_ be a story.
  • by SuperKendall (25149) * on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @12:26PM (#11551978)
    The link in the article that the manager pointed employees to, http://experiencemore, doesn't seem to resolve to anything here - I wonder if that's an internal site, and what is on it? Or perhaps they just messed up the URL.
    • If a website contains no TLD or main site name (for example microsoft.com) it assumes it's on a local intranet, so yes it is an internal site, for example here I can type http://ece/ and it will show me the page you would see at http://www.ece.uwaterloo.ca [uwaterloo.ca] since I'm on the uwaterloo.ca domain's computers

      http://experiencemore is likely just an internal pointer to this site [microsoft.com]
      For your information, the same applies for mail servers, so if I send an email from this mail server using the local email service (n
  • by mrm677 (456727) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @12:35PM (#11552096)
    Back when I used to work at Motorola in Schaumburg, the CEO sent out a company-wide email saying how he was displeased at the number of employees seen with Nokia and other non-Motorola phones. So he offered free Motorola phones to the first 1,000 employees that responded and urged the rest to buy a Motorola.

    He was especially pissed at the salesmen, trying to sign the big carriers to promote Motorola phones, who had Nokia's hanging from their belt! Makes sense for the visible people I guess.
  • Shocking! (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Anita Coney (648748) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @12:35PM (#11552100) Homepage
    The most popular portable music player in the world is the most popular portable music player on Microsoft's campus?! How is that possible?!

  • by jhwang (214546) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @12:44PM (#11552201)
    shows the power of demand-driven bottom-up interest in digital music players versus the top-down directives from a supplier (i.e., marketing initiatives from the corporate office). the most successful marketing campaigns mix top-down from the supplier and the bottom-up from the consumer of course. in this case, microsoft is out of that product loop with their own employees.

    And the posters above who claim that microsoft is not competing with Apple, you're wrong. In a narrow sense, it's true that Microsoft does not sell a portable music device. In a larger sense, Microsoft IS competing with Apple when it comes to digital consumer entertainment platforms.

    That is why Microsfot has spent more than a year denigrating the iPod and promoting its "open" audio format and associated MP3 players. This is why microsoft has been pushing "http://www.digitaljoy.com/ [digitaljoy.com]" at CES.

    Just because Microsoft does not manufacture Intel hardware, are you going to say Microsoft doesn't compete with Apple b/c Apple sells computers? Sheesh!

  • by Sophrosyne (630428) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @01:18PM (#11552618) Homepage
    A little image I fixed up in photoshop :)
    Here [mac.com]
  • GM (Score:4, Interesting)

    by trailerparkcassanova (469342) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @01:54PM (#11553154)
    GM encourages their employees to ask for non-GM cars when renting so as to check out the competition. You steal ideas where you can find them.
  • by otis wildflower (4889) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @02:07PM (#11553333) Homepage
    ... Is that the smart co will see this and say 'how do we make our own dogfood better than this?', then go out and do it.

    The dumb co will see this and put out a memo telling folks it's a CLM.

    Gosh, I wonder which way this will go?

    (And yes, I know M$ doesn't build the player hardware, but they _could_.. I mean, they build good HW (xbox, kynds, mice, joysticks)...)
  • by very (241808) on Wednesday February 02, 2005 @05:04PM (#11555482) Homepage Journal
    Paul "The Microsoft's Whipping Boy" Thurrott sez:
    "Hide The Truth, Here Comes Leander Kahney
    Leander Kahney is a reporter for Wired News. I've been doing a little research into him lately, after being hugely disappointed with his book "Cult of Mac," which is a collection of his Mac-oriented Wired articles. The problem? Kahney's not into facts. Instead, he likes to sprinkle his articles with anecdotal evidence and quotes from a single source, which he then sells as facts. No big deal, right? I mean, that's what most bloggers, tech new aggregator sites, and Mac news sites do too. Sure. But the problem is that Kahney writes for Wired. And thus, he is representing a respected source. That is, people believe this crap."


    Read more @: http://www.internet-nexus.com/ [internet-nexus.com]

    Honestly, who in the right mind would want to believe Paul Thurrott?

    Has Paul Thurrott even realized that he is the Rush Limbaugh of Microsoft?

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