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OS X Businesses Operating Systems Apple

Mac OS X 10.2.2 Update Available 518

Posted by pudge
from the it-fixes-all-of-your-problems-yes-even-those dept.
Fork420 writes "Apple has released the 10.2.2 update. According to Apple: The 10.2.2 Update delivers enhanced functionality and improved reliability for the following applications and technologies: Address Book, iChat, IP Firewall, Mail, Print Center, Rendezvous, Sherlock and Windows file service discovery. The update also includes the updated services previously delivered in Security Update 2002-09-20. For detailed information on this Update, please visit http://www.info.apple.com/kbnum/n107140 (when this story was posted, this link was not yet working) Enjoy..."
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Mac OS X 10.2.2 Update Available

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  • by RobRancho (569680) on Monday November 11, 2002 @06:22PM (#4646035) Homepage
    is included too! :)
    • by xenocyst (618913) on Monday November 11, 2002 @06:31PM (#4646104)
      But, "Provides a foundation for the journalling filesystem (JFS), which may currently be enabled via Disk Utility on Mac OS X Server systems." doesn't exactly seem like support for JFS, more of an experimental thing? It does specfically say "OS X Server", and "foundation" after all. =p
    • One Problem: (Score:4, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward on Monday November 11, 2002 @06:33PM (#4646121)
      Journalling will be great. especially on the disk servers with 480GB worth of storage. But what the Xserves are missing is raid 5. I was pretty upset when I discovered that they only came with raid1 and raid0.

      the missing raid mode is worse than it seems. The mac xserves come with 4 big IDE disks. If you want to you want the Xserve to play nice in a unix environment then its a good idea to format the disks UFS. (you dont have to, NFS works fine with HFS+, but you risk screwing yourself with the file name case insensitivity of the mac. A rare event since most people dont have important files that differ in name only in their case but it's lurking.

      But wait! you cant format the whole thing UFS becausesome of the mac apps break unless they are on HFS+. So this means you need to format atleast one of the disks HFS for the OS and apps. that leaves three disks. But in RAID 1, you cant use an odd number of disks. So that leaves two disks for raid 1 UFS.

      Thus the best you can do is 120GB HFS+ Raid 1 and 120GB UFS Raid 1. So out of four disks the most you can get is 120GB UFS redundant storage. Ah you say, why not just make a small HFS+ partition and let the rest be UFS. Well apple does not yet support partitioning a disk with different File systems. Thus you cant split the disk into UFS and HFS+ partitions.

      Two companies are promised a partionalble raid 5 system (Xraid and NXraid) but both suddenly announced delayed shippments. My guess is they are trying to incoporate this new journaling system.

      I spoke to apple about this several times. It was hinted to me to keep watching because big things were coming. I suspect these are the Journalling FS and and an outboard mass storage disk sytem. but that's a conjecture.

      That's the bad news. The good news is that these Xserves are otherwise a very good deal. The throughput is better than comparably priced linux systems. Also they occupy only 1U but hold 480GB of hot swapable storage. Yes there are some NAS systems that are 1U but they are about 10 X slower in throughput, not to mention that they dont support as many services as the macs (LDAP, NFS, SAMBA, SSH, SCP, FTP, MAIL server, RSYNC,NET info, Net boot ...). The macs have dual Gig-E too. ANd in a very nice move Apple will sell you a spare parts kit with everyhing you are likely to need to fix a deadXSERVE in the field. Plus 24hour tech support.

      the other nice thing about the Xserve is the construction. In addition to tool-free hot swap drives, the entire chasis slides out to the front revealing everything with no screws to undo or panels to remove. It's a clever design lacking the usual add-on slider rails of your gneric linux boxes. There's even a firewire port on the front for quick access. Another nice feature is that you dont need a terminal to set them up, they will auotmatically find the administration computer on any DNS system. And if you need to have a terminal attached, you can buy a UPS based KVM switch rather then the usual clumsy Video/mouse/keyboard KVMs.

      Anyhow the bottom line is this as soon as a partionalble journaled raid 5 system is avaliable the Xserves will be one of the least expensivie full featured HIGH QUALITY 1U half terrabyte disk servers you can own. (note I said High quality). I just wish they would hurry up since I have two of these cooling their heels waiting for raid 5.
      • Re:One Problem: (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Cutriss (262920) on Monday November 11, 2002 @06:46PM (#4646239) Homepage
        you dont have to, NFS works fine with HFS+, but you risk screwing yourself with the file name case insensitivity of the mac. A rare event since most people dont have important files that differ in name only in their case but it's lurking.

        It's possible that perhaps the UNIX community needs to move past case-sensitivity in filenames and foldernames. Just because UNIX has been doing it that way for 30 years doesn't mean that it needs to be done that way, and apparently both Windows and MacOS have a hard time cooperating with it.

        Example - I'm doing development on a local machine with Visual Studio 6. I try to move my project to a Samba share so that I can work with it in a different lab...but suddenly my project won't build. It turns out that Visual Studio makes assumptions about lowercase letters in the pathing for the various files it creates during compilation. UNIX obviously doesn't abide by this, and so returns "file not found".

        Sloppy? You bet. Important? Outside of anal-retentiveness, I can't think of a single reason that you'd *WANT* to be able to support filenames that differ only by case. It's an HCI issue for one thing, and the system incompatibility issues that are now surfacing are making the issue more visible.

        I'd welcome some examples of places/functionality where case is of critical importance.
        • Re:One Problem: (Score:4, Interesting)

          by sesquiped (40687) on Monday November 11, 2002 @07:17PM (#4646494)
          I often name files starting with uppercase letters so they don't conflict with others for tab-completion, but that's not the important issue. The important issue is unicode. In general, it's much more difficult to do things case-insensitively when dealing with unicode, because case isn't a very well-defined concept. Sure, for English text using the Latin alphabet, it's pretty straightforward, but for other languages and other alphabets, it can get much messier, and you have situations like several consecutive characters being shortened to a single one, as part of case normalizing, or a character turning into multiple ones. So strings can even change size as part of case normalization, making the implementation of an accurate case-insensitive unicode string comparison quite a difficult and complex piece of code, and in particular, one that you don't want anywhere near your filesystem code.
          • Re:One Problem: (Score:3, Interesting)

            by Anonymous Coward
            Sorry, I don't buy it.

            Tab completion in shells is not an issue. It works fine on HFS+, and is just as case-sensitive as always or not, depending on your shell settings.

            So your beef with case-sensitivity comes down to: Unicode is hard, and because it's hard, you don't want to do it. But you don't have to do it. Apple does it for you. Apple has been doing it for a long time for you. Apple even made it work very quickly for the common case, because Apple is just hoopy.

          • Internationalization IS the big problem. If you want open() to be "case-insensitive," the kernel must include not only the simple mapping from English uppercase letters to English lowercase letters, but also the mappings from Traditional to Simplified Chinese characters, Japanese Hiragana to Katakana, etc. (you're talking megabytes of kernel memory here).. Now you can and SHOULD do this kind of thing in user-space GUI libraries (e.g. File Open dialog boxes), but underneath the kernel should not do anything more than strict byte-matching.

            In other words, blame Visual Studio for handling cases wrong...
            • Re:One Problem: (Score:4, Informative)

              by Twirlip of the Mists (615030) <twirlipofthemists@yahoo.com> on Tuesday November 12, 2002 @03:07AM (#4649177)
              I'm not a native speaker of Japanese or Chinese, but I'm a little educated in both. Hiragana and katakana are different alphabets with different purposes. The katakana character for the syllable "ka" is not equivalent to the hiragana character for the syllable "ka." There's no circumstance under which you'd want corresponding hiragana and katakana characters to be considered equal.

              As far as Chinese goes, traditional Chinese characters are used in Taiwan, while simplified Chinese characters are used in mainland China. Again, they're not equivalent. So you wouldn't need or want to map between them.

              The uppercase-lowercase thing is pretty much unique to Latin and Latin-derived alphabets. Some languages have contextual forms-- for example, an initial character in Arabic looks different from the same character in medial or final position in the word-- but that's a rendering issue, not an encoding issue.

              I actually think it would be quite straightforward to design a Unicode-based system that's case-insensitive with respect to alphabets that have distinct cases. More work than doing so for ASCII, of course, but not insurmountably more.
              • Re:One Problem: (Score:4, Interesting)

                by bursch-X (458146) on Tuesday November 12, 2002 @05:08AM (#4649505)
                There's no circumstance under which you'd want corresponding hiragana and katakana characters to be considered equal.
                Huh? What about displaying Japanese file names in Dictionary order (aiueo), then of course you don't care whether it's Katakana or Hiragana, but you care whether any "nigori" are used etc. and you definitely want to to intermix the two systems. (and the same goes for the readings of the Kanji, you don't care for the Kanji used, but the Hiragana readings of them).
        • NO! (Score:4, Interesting)

          by spitzak (4019) on Tuesday November 12, 2002 @12:32AM (#4648480) Homepage
          "Case insensitivity" is a user interface issue that should not be in the innards of the operating system. If a file system can treat a filename as a sequence of bytes that have no other meaning, then it can be written to be far more reliable, secure, and dependable, and easier to prove that there are no bugs.

          For the "average user" case means nothing. Grandma picks files by clicking on the little pictures and would never notice if many files had the same name. The *ONLY* use for "case insensitive" is for CLI interfaces, and it is amazing that the same people who say "Unix sucks because of case sensitive filenames" are the same ones that say "it sucks because you have to use the CLI". Hey, if you don't need a CLI, you have eliminated the only reason for case insensitive filenames! Not only that, case insensitivity actually interferes with user-friendliness in a CLI as it makes it more difficult to do really advanced things in the user program, such as spelling correction of filenames.

          • Re:NO! (Score:5, Interesting)

            by overunderunderdone (521462) on Tuesday November 12, 2002 @10:28AM (#4650462)
            For the "average user" case means nothing. Grandma picks files by clicking on the little pictures and would never notice if many files had the same name.

            Lets test your theory using the common scenario of doing tech support for Grandma over the phone:
            Me: "OK, Grandma open now click on the picture of a paper that says 'read me'"
            Grandma clicks on 'Read Me' - after long conversation I finally realise she opened the wrong file
            Me: "No, the OTHER file that says 'read me'"
            Grandma clicks on 'READ ME' - another long period of miscommunication follows
            Me: "OK, Grandma open the file that says 'read me' but ignore the files 'READ ME', 'Read Me', 'READ me' and 'read ME'.
            Grandma does an Ellen Feiss "hugnh???"

            The obvious advantage of case insensitivity is that it is easier for humans to talk & think about what is on a computer without confusion. Even the tech savvy may have the occasional problem with distinguishing between 'Read Me' and 'Read me'.

            case insensitivity actually interferes with user-friendliness in a CLI as it makes it more difficult to do really advanced things in the user program, such as spelling correction of filenames.

            I don't follow you, how does it make this more difficult?
        • The way I see it, upper case letters and lower case letters are different. Simple as that. They have different numerical values, for example. Why should we want to create arbitrary rules dictating that two fundamentally different filenames should in fact be the same just because it seems to make sense linguistically? I think such rules create unnecessary complications.
      • just use Disk Copy to make a .dmg image. Mount it and install your 'HFS+ only' software to it.

        Before I erased OS X, I did this sucessfully with Bryce(now running under MoL) and Flash MX (now running under MoL).

        If I do go rackmount, it will be with Xserves, provided I can return OS X and go Linux.
      • by Anonymous Coward
        I personally have formatted a Mac with a small (20mb) HFS partition for the MacOS, and the rest for UFS for linux.

        I used Apple's own HD partitioning util, too. Its just an older version. (3.5 or something like that)

        It can still be found on the web, and will still work.
      • Re:One Problem: (Score:3, Informative)

        by ivan256 (17499)
        I was pretty upset when I discovered that they only came with raid1 and raid0.

        Standard practice nowadays is to use RAID 0 and RAID 1 together instead of using RAID 5. The data protection is better, and the performance is too. You should make mirror sets, and then stripe them rather than the other way around. That way your system can keep running at full speed if any single disk breaks. The other thing you may consider (I don't know if this is possible under OSX, but it should be) Is to RAID your partitions instead of partitioning your RAID. This should overcome your filesystem issue.

        With the low cost of storage these days, RAID 5 is basically obsolete. Spend the extra few gigabytes, and use RAID 0+1
        • Re:One Problem: (Score:5, Insightful)

          by Twirlip of the Mists (615030) <twirlipofthemists@yahoo.com> on Monday November 11, 2002 @07:14PM (#4646463)
          With the low cost of storage these days, RAID 5 is basically obsolete. Spend the extra few gigabytes, and use RAID 0+1

          That's an overstatement. ATA/IDE/whatever storage is pretty cheap, but SCSI and Fibre Channel disks are still pricey. In order to protect a 1 TB filesystem with RAID 0+1, you'd have to have 2 TB worth of (let's say) Fibre Channel drives. That extra terabyte would cost you many thousands of dollars. But to protect the same filesystem with RAID 3 or RAID 5, you only have to have (at least) one spare drive. That's a lot cheaper than the 6 or 8 or 16 or whatever drives you'd have to buy to mirror the whole filesystem.

          I'd say that for filesystems in the range of 0-500 GB using inexpensive disks, RAID 3 and RAID 5 are probably unnecessary. But outside that set of conditions, RAID 0+1 just isn't practical.
      • Re:One Problem: (Score:4, Informative)

        by zzen (190880) on Monday November 11, 2002 @07:44PM (#4646659)
        Ah you say, why not just make a small HFS+ partition and let the rest be UFS. Well apple does not yet support partitioning a disk with different File systems. Thus you cant split the disk into UFS and HFS+ partitions.

        Well I don't know of which support exactly you are speaking of, but I've been running 2 HFS+ partitions and 1 UFS partition on my iMac (with a single 40GB disk) since 10.0.3 (client) and continue to do so until now (10.2.2).

        And in case you forgot to setup the FS types correctly when partitioning, here's the hint how to do it afterwards. You cannot normaly just select "Erase disk" and put a different FS type on it. It will offer only the same type as the partition already has. BUT if you reboot with an OS X install CD and launch Disk Utility, you will be able to change the format of the partition without touching the rest of the disk.

      • RAID (Score:5, Informative)

        by MrChuck (14227) on Monday November 11, 2002 @08:18PM (#4646915)
        Hmmm, software raid ain't cutting it and ain't available for RAID 5 (and dearies, RAID 5 is out there, big time - a big win for my friend putting up about a terrabyte/week for their web server farm).

        What to do, what to do? /me strokes beard. Hey! How about using "A HARDWARE RAID!"

        Why waste your CPU cycles calculating stuff when you can have a dedicated processor taking care of your storage issues?

        Call your nearby raid vendor and get a box in. It speaks SCSI, it gives you lots of bonuses. Me? For high performance RAID at a decent price (too much for hobbyists and home users, don't waste your time), try these guys [baydel.com]. Just a personal favorite, I'm not part of their company, just a customer.

        Why hardware RAID? When your MoBo/CPU/Disk dies and you can't get that software RAID reconfigured, you unplug the hardware RAID, plug it into a new machine and just go.

        When you want real speed, those baydel guys have a screaming, mirrored RAM cache so you get to write at 160MB/s.

        Jeez, you put all that money into your server and network connections and want to cheap out by using slow IDE disks and your CPU to do all the work?

        HFS+? Yeah, I still have it for my Mac Classic II on an 80MB drive.
        THanks, I'll use FFS with softupdates or ReiserFS (or XFS mmmmmm) on my real volumes.

      • Re:One Problem: (Score:4, Informative)

        by Drishmung (458368) on Tuesday November 12, 2002 @12:58AM (#4648582)
        Thus the best you can do is 120GB HFS+ Raid 1 and 120GB UFS Raid 1. So out of four disks the most you can get is 120GB UFS redundant storage. Ah you say, why not just make a small HFS+ partition and let the rest be UFS. Well apple does not yet support partitioning a disk with different File systems. Thus you cant split the disk into UFS and HFS+ partitions.

        How odd. The HFS+/UFS partitions I have on my single IDE drive are a figment of my imagination then.

        Or is it that Apple RAID doesn't support this?

    • Don't get too happy yet...

      * Provides a foundation for the journalling filesystem (JFS), which may currently be enabled via Disk Utility on Mac OS X Server systems.

      That's right. I read the notes from last week's seed builds and noticed that OS X Server was one point number ahead, and only the Server version had HFS+J support. I was afraid that this would happen.

      I wanted it for my laptop, dammit! That's where I need it the most!

  • by FyRE666 (263011) on Monday November 11, 2002 @06:24PM (#4646051) Homepage
    (when this story was posted, this link was not yet working)

    That's unusual, usually links only stop working 5 minutes after the story is posted...
  • by RAMMS+EIN (578166) on Monday November 11, 2002 @06:29PM (#4646082) Homepage Journal
    ``when this story was posted, this link was not yet working''
    So...10.2.2 features a reverse slashdot effect - the site only gets working when a certain threshold of connections per second is surpassed?
  • by ku hand luke (624783) on Monday November 11, 2002 @06:30PM (#4646093)
    "- Improves the Find function of the Finder by no longer finding items in invisible folders." I hope this doesn't break the runaround I use on my brother's iPod: In Jag, I open his iPod on the desktop and do a search in that finder window for any .mp3 and voila!, all files available for drag and drop. We'll see soon enough...
  • by sporty (27564) on Monday November 11, 2002 @06:30PM (#4646096) Homepage
    Hopefully they fixed the mail.app program. If you have only 1 account, and it's imap, you won't see folders on the account. You have to add another account, even a dummy one that has no mail, to see folders of the first imap account. Stupid mail.app proggie.. had me using that stupid enterage program.
  • by Palshife (60519) on Monday November 11, 2002 @06:32PM (#4646108) Homepage
    when this story was posted, this link was not yet working

    Did the submitter just guess the url of the article? Damn, you gotta teach me how to do that.
  • 10.2.2 Changes (Score:5, Informative)

    by PatJensen (170806) on Monday November 11, 2002 @06:32PM (#4646112) Homepage
    Here are the changes in 10.2.2. Enjoy! -Pat

    Digital Hub and Peripheral Device Enhancements

    • Improves playback of large media files and peripheral device file copying.
    • Resolves a rare situation in which an inadvertently-ejected CD cannot be remounted and applications accessing the disc cannot be quit.
    • Addresses an issue in which an enhanced CD's data and audio sessions do not appear as expected on the desktop when using iTunes and inserting the disc more than once.
    • Addresses a formatting issue that could occur when printing or previewing some TIFF documents.
    • Addresses an issue in which ColorSync settings for some third-party displays are not retained after restarting or logging out.
    • Addresses an issue when printing more than one copy of a file to a postscript printer from Adobe PhotoShop 7.0.
    • Improves compatibility with HP 4MV printers when printing over an Ethernet network.
    • Adds support for additional third-party disc burners, including: LaCie d2 48x24x48x, Sony CRX-820E, Toshiba SD-R2212 and SD-R1202, Pioneer DVR-105, and Yamaha CDW-F1 44x24x44x models.

    Networking and Modem Enhancements
    • SMB shared volumes may now be browsed by their user-assigned name.
    • Resolves an issue in which an incorrect "Change Password Failed" message may appear when when changing a Mac OS X 10.2 Server client's password via AFP.
    • Addresses an issue in which some internal Apple modems may fail to respond, displaying a "Could not open the communication device" message.
    • Addresses an issue in which no sound is produced by some internal Apple modems until several seconds after making a connection.
    • Resolves an issue in which some internal Apple modems fail to respond when connecting to the Internet.
    • Error and warning dialogs boxes are no longer displayed if you cancel the mounting of an iDisk from the authentication dialog box.
    • Addresses a startup issue that could occur if an LDAP server designated in Directory Access is not available.
    • Addresses a data loss issue which could occur when copying a file whose filename ends with "#02," or other hexadecimal number, via AFP.
    • Available disk space on an iDisk is updated more quickly after deleting files.
    • Addresses an issue in which an iDisk would appear with an inaccurate 1GB capacity and 1023 MB available.
    • Addresses some issues that could cause a "error -36" alert message when copying files to an iDisk.


    Address Book and Mail Enhancements
    • Resolves an issue in which Address Book could become unresponsive when using the Large Type menu and switching between applications.
    • Address Book can now better import groups from prior versions of Address Book.
    • Resolves a potential issue when transferring vcards from Address Book to a cellular phone via Bluetooth.
    • Improves Address Book compatibility with users that are already on an AIM Buddy List.
    • Allows address information to be imported when dragging vCards to Address Book which were created with Address Book from any version of Mac OS X 10.1.
    • Corrects Address Book address format for Australian entries.
    • Improves responsiveness when switching in and out of edit mode in the Address Book.
    • Address Book entries without a name included now appear in the All group list with the email address as the name, instead of "No Name".
    • Addresses the rare issue in which Mail may unexpectedly quit when replying to a message.
    • Improves the responsiveness of the Mail application's date column and thread highlighting feature.
    • Improves the reliability of transitioning a Mac OS X 10.1.5 Address Book.addressbook to an Address Book for Mac OS X 10.2 format.


    Application Enhancements
    • Improves compatibility for Microsoft PowerPoint presentations that use animations.
    • Addresses a potential Disk Copy volume imaging permissions issue that could affect non-Admin users.
    • Improves updating of applications installed with Mac OS X, updating them only if they have not been relocated or deleted.
    • Addresses a display issue that may occur when Command-clicking a URL in some third-party applications, including BBEdit and Mailsmith.
    • Addresses a situation in which the menu bar and Dock are not shown, after quitting a third-party game application, until the desktop is clicked.
    • Addresses an issue in which some PDF files created within Mac OS X do not open as expected with Adobe Acrobat Reader 5.
    • Reduces occurrences of "missing text" when browsing some web pages.
    • Improves compatibility for FAXstf when a fax is being sent while the computer is restarted, shut down, or entering sleep mode.


    Other Enhancements
    • Provides a foundation for the journalling filesystem (JFS), which may currently be enabled via Disk Utility on Mac OS X Server systems.
    • Improves security when using a read-write disk image volume in which "Ignore ownership on this volume" has been deselected.
    • Addresses an issue in which automatic Software Update notifications are turned off when upgrading from Mac OS X 10.1 to Mac OS X 10.2.
    • Addresses an issue in which, after upgrading to Mac OS X 10.2, an unexpected value in a user's com.apple.LaunchServices.plist file could prevent proper startup.
    • Addresses a potential kernel panic situation when using three video cards and more than 512 MB of RAM.
    • Addresses a potential issue in which an unauthorized user could log in as a deleted user.
    • Improves the Find function of the Finder by no longer finding items in invisible folders.
    • Reduces the time required for switching between Sherlock channels when using a low-bandwidth connection
    • Sherlock channels may now be saved as a file.
    • Allows automatic login to work as expected following an Archive and Install.
    • Improves time needed to wake some portable computers.
    • Addresses a potential loss of video when waking some PowerBooks from sleep after using DVD Player.
    • Addresses a potential issue in which the computer does not respond when quitting DVD Player on some portable computers.
    • Includes Apache version 1.3.27.
    • Addresses a potential security issue in which access to system daemons could be blocked when RFC-based services are enabled.
    • by aardvarkjoe (156801) on Monday November 11, 2002 @06:44PM (#4646221)
      Addresses a potential kernel panic situation when using three video cards and more than 512 MB of RAM.


      Gee ... I sure wish I was in a situation to run into that particular bug...

      • Re:10.2.2 Changes (Score:3, Informative)

        by singularity (2031)
        Here I am with only *two* installed video cards and 1.25 gigs of RAM. I have another video card not in a machine, but all of my PCI slots are currently filled (second ethernet card, four port USB card, and SCSI card).

        So I suppose I cannot test this out to make sure it works.

        There was a problem with the 10.2.1 upgrade with multiple video cards of different make (nVidia and ATI, for example) and more than one gig of RAM. Sounds similar, but it sounds like the one that Apple fixed is somewhat different. Both of my cards are Radeons (7500 and 7000), so it never bothered me.

        As another poster said, one of the nice things about MacOS is the ease of using old video cards to drive second displays. I have had multiple combinations of cards and monitors and have never had a problem running them at the same time.
    • Re:10.2.2 Changes (Score:5, Insightful)

      by ScottForbes (528679) on Monday November 11, 2002 @10:52PM (#4647894) Homepage
      • Improves updating of applications installed with Mac OS X, updating them only if they have not been relocated or deleted.

      Aaaaaarrrrrggghh! Apple replaces one Wrong Thing with another. Before 10.2.2, Apple's installer would blindly write files into /Applications/Mail.app/contents/resources without first checking to see whether Mail.app was still in the /Applications folder.

      Now Apple's installer looks for /Applications/Mail.app, and aborts the install if it isn't there. For the love of Tog, how hard is it to actually find Mail.app, considering that the OS already has this ability built in??

      MacOS X can find where Microsoft Excel is hiding on my hard drive every time I double-click on a spreadsheet - how hard can it be to find /Applications/Apple/Mail.app? Why should I be forced to organize my /Applications folder in a particular way (or, more accurately, why should I be prevented from organizing the folder) just to satisfy Apple's brain-dead installer scripts?

      Now I have to re-construct the /Applications folder to look exactly the way it did after a clean install, or I can't get application updates. MacOS 9 didn't require this. I could understand Apple's installer getting uppity if I turned /bin or /usr into my personal carnival of idiosyncracies, but I can't understand why Apple's new and improved OS is hard-wired to implode when I move an application from one folder to another.

  • Once they fix pam, I won't have many bitches with OSX. As it is, you cannot kerberos login and exect a screensaver to work wihout a local password.
  • by underwhelm (53409)
    I'm still waiting for VCD support. >:(
    • by joel8x (324102)
      VideoLAN Client works fine for me.
  • ...that they've fixed the NSPDFRep bug that made LaTeX documents print out incorrectly.

    If you've got LaTeX installed, you can test this with
    \documentclass{article}\usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document}$$\left(\dfrac{\sqrt{2}}{2}\right) $$\end{document}
    and see the broken parentheses under high magnifications.

  • Should be good. (Score:2, Interesting)

    by dsanfte (443781)
    Many of us have been waiting awhile for this release. Certainly I have. Perhaps this new software will solve the stability issues many users were having with the older version.
  • by andyring (100627)
    # Addresses a potential kernel panic situation when using three video cards and more than 512 MB of RAM.

    If only I had to worry about this situation!

    # Addresses a potential issue in which an unauthorized user could log in as a deleted user.

    Glad to see Apple still on the top with security.

    # Improves Address Book compatibility with users that are already on an AIM Buddy List.

    Good, this was an issue I submitted through Developer bug reporting, glad to see it fixed!

  • by Namaste (11612) on Monday November 11, 2002 @06:48PM (#4646261)
    Here [apple.com] is a link to the combo update that allows you to upgrade directly from 10.2 to 10.2.2 instead of from 10.2.1 to 10.2.2.
  • by underwhelm (53409) <.underwhelm. .at. .gmail.com.> on Monday November 11, 2002 @06:51PM (#4646290) Homepage Journal
    "Improves time needed to wake some portable computers."

    Uh oh. If my TiBook wakes up any faster than it already does, it'll resume before I even open the lid. Brings a whole new meaning to the term 'race condition.'
    • Hypothesis: Apple laptops premptively wake from sleep mode.

      Test: Think about opening your TiBook by at the last moment divert your attention (tell your wife to yell at you sometime tomorow when your about to lift the lid or something).

      Possible results:
      1: it wakes;
      hyphothesis upheld.
      2: it doesn't wake
      Apple has surely outdone all previous innovation with this notebook that actually predicts the future.
  • Apple announces purchase of the slashdot domain for announcement of OS-X update information.
  • by geek (5680) on Monday November 11, 2002 @06:59PM (#4646375) Homepage
    enter the terminal.app and type:

    diskutil

    You'll get a list of diskutil options, two of them are "enableJounal" and "disableJournal".

    Happy hunting

    -todd
  • W00t! (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Squidgee (565373) <squidgeeOO1@h[ ]ail.com ['otm' in gap]> on Monday November 11, 2002 @07:33PM (#4646595)
    Haha, I'm so excited. I can get a real JFS (No, Suzy, Window's JFS isn't a -true- JFS; it doesn't let you repair any changes).

    Now to wait until all 24.4megs download on my horrid connection (24.0kbps right now!). Wow, I think the download status bar just twitched!

  • performance (Score:3, Interesting)

    by linuxpng (314861) on Monday November 11, 2002 @07:58PM (#4646759)
    I know apple clearly states that you are going to take a 10 to 15 percent disk performance hit when enabling the journal. I'm not sure about everyone else, but with the update and the journal everything seems even faster than 10.2.1. Anyone have similar experiences? I'm launching apps and just generally messing around. I've noticed that photoshop 7 loads in about 7 seconds as opposed to the 13 that it used to as well. Could be imagining it...
  • by rworne (538610) on Monday November 11, 2002 @08:22PM (#4646944) Homepage
    ssh (or telnet if you are daring) into your box:

    %su
    password:<enter password>
    %softwareupdate 3404

    (software update progress occurs)

    %reboot

    You are now updated to 10.2.2

  • by DiscoOnTheSide (544139) <[ajfili] [at] [eden.rutgers.edu]> on Monday November 11, 2002 @08:47PM (#4647123) Homepage
    I don't know if anyone else had this problem, but this update seems to have killed the man command in the terminal. no matter what you type now man says "invalid option -- C" did this happen to anyone else, and can anyone else give me any tips on fixing it? How shall acheive my UNIX-Guru status without my precious man pages!? I mean, I just started growing this beard and not showering :-P
  • by psyconaut (228947) on Monday November 11, 2002 @09:41PM (#4647469)
    ...they seem to have some pretty robust update servers.....I also grab every update pretty much immediately and never have trouble getting them.

    Funny how Apple can have software update facilities that must be handing out several hundred thousand 25Mbyte updates a day.....and many websites can't even cope with the traffic Slashdot sends their way ;-)

    -psy
    • They run it all over Akamais network, like their quicktime site.
      • by Sycraft-fu (314770) on Tuesday November 12, 2002 @06:50AM (#4649777)
        They are a company that delivers content for you. You pay them to hold your stuff. However they don't just put it in a fast datacentre, they actually have little cache engines that they give to large networks (like universities). This means that if you happen to be on one of those networks, your downloads are incredably fast.

        They just did this at U of A, where I work. They shipped us 3 servers and a switch (for free) and then are helping us get them set up. The effect, when they are running, will be that any traffic bound for Akamai's network will instead get serverd from those local computers. So instead of loading down their and our internet links, they will come form a LAN connection.

        Really it's a win for all involved. We are happy because it reduces our traffic at no cost to us. They are happy because it reduces the traffic on their network. Their customers are happy because it means fast data delivery to lots of people.
  • by valmont (3573) on Tuesday November 12, 2002 @04:03PM (#4653429) Homepage Journal
    My entourage email DB file was about 400+MB ... I have a back-up of a few months ago somewhere. It still sucks. It was that big because i had imported a couple of years' worth of e-mail. anyway.

    Last nite I ran the 10.2.2 update.

    Rebooted.

    Did a 'df' in a terminal and noticed I had a lot more hard drive space. Gone down from 83%+ full to 77% full. It was late. Didn't think much of it.

    This morning I start entourage and all my account settings, email, folders, filters, addresses are *gone*. The DB in microsoft user data was brand new from scratch. It even popped the set-up assistant.

    What did stick around was my signature and rules. Weird.

    I called apple they're supposed to get back to me today.

    Can anyone think of any issue with the new journaling file system and a big file?

    Uuuugh :( note to self. Always back-up before update.

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