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Wall Street Journal: Mac vs. PC 142

Posted by pudge
from the no-such-thing-as-too-many-pundits dept.
cpk0 writes "Walt Mossberg is taking a few days to discuss the differences between Mac and PCs, and which is suitable for whom. He begins by saying the tides have definitely turned in regards to Apple's state as a computer which he will recommend. This is the first in a miniature series of articles by Mossberg touching base on the Apple vs. PC situation (but don't worry, it's not at all about bashing one side)."
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Wall Street Journal: Mac vs. PC

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  • Standards (Score:4, Funny)

    by pmz (462998) on Friday June 21, 2002 @02:04PM (#3744811) Homepage
    From Mr. Mossberg's WSJ article:

    It's easier today than ever to use a Mac in a Windows world and to share information. This is true partly because the Internet and e-mail don't distinguish between computing platforms.

    Oh boy, does Microsoft hate statements like this :)
    • by Laplace (143876) on Friday June 21, 2002 @02:36PM (#3745022)
      It's easier today than ever to use a Mac in a Windows world and to share information. This is true partly because the Internet and e-mail don't distinguish between computing platforms.


      Except with respect to VB scripting worms.
    • Yeah, Mac and Windows mailers support croos-platform encodings for attachments. But whenever I've worked in a mixed environment, it's always been a nightmare to get people to use them. You're just continually dealing with Mac people who complain that they can't read your attachments, and who send you attachments packaged as sit files!

      Besides, email attachments are not a practical way to share any but the most trivial documents. Not to mention the virus risks!

      Why on earth does Slashdot keep trumpeting Mossberg's pronouncements as if they meant jack? His sole qualification to have any sort of technical opinion is (according to him) technical illiteracy [slashdot.org]!

      • Re:Utter crap (Score:2, Informative)

        by dalamcd (573483)
        ... and who send you attachments packaged as sit files!

        Er, excuse me, but Stuffit Expander [stuffit.com] is available for Mac, PC and Linux for free, and it's all you need to unstuff _any_ .sit file.

        dalamcd

        P.S. No, stuffit.com is not a porn site...

        • I didn't say it wasn't possible to read Mac-specific formats such as SIT. But each little platform-specific format makes life a little more complicated. Just dealing with the minor differences between text files on Unix, Windows, and MacOS can be a nightmare. Mossberg seems to think that use of email attachments simply negates these problems.
    • The difference in a nutshell. Mac - Working PC - This application has caused an illegal operation, and will be shut down... Does that paint a picture?
    • I just was wondering how much money changed hands between Apple and a poster to start this thread
  • As a member of the entertainment industry, I have to throw my weight into the Mac camp. Music apps like Cubase that just aren't available for Intel PCs are essential to the cutting-edge musician.

    The new Macintosh Operating System, affectionately referred to as "X," also does a superior job of coupling media programs with the OS itself. I believe this is an effect of the Open Source nature of the OS, as software developers appear to be crafting their wares with greater insight into what happens "beneath the hood."

    Sadly, Windows' paltry competition in this area has encouraged stagnation in the Macintosh audio market. Hopefully, Linux will cause things to pick up a bit, or music fans may be forced to listen to the same crap that has been flooding the airwaves for the last decade or so.

    Cheers.
    • "Music apps like Cubase that just aren't available for Intel PCs are essential to the cutting-edge musician"

      First, I must say that I am avid Mac fan and a musician who has been using Cubase for about 4 years now. I did want to point out, (is this REALLY Elton John?), that Cubase is indeed available for the PC platform. In fact, Cubase SX hit has already hit the market for the PC whilst we are still waiting on the 'X' side. Such is life...
    • Mac OS X isn't Free Software (aka Open Source). Period. There is no halfway free or kind of free. So please don't spread around such a misconception.
      • MacOS X could be considered an application which runs on Darwin. Darwin IS open source.

        It's like running CDE on Linux. Free OS, non-free application.
  • by zulux (112259) on Friday June 21, 2002 @02:16PM (#3744862) Homepage Journal
    Yep!

    I have serveral clients with too much money on their hands that have wanted a fileserver for home - Usually I take an older ATX box of theirs, put it in a decent case with a good and quite powersupply (Antec/PC Power And Cooling) and replace the processor fan. Plop in FreeBSD, Samba and hide it in the closet.

    Last week, we used an IMac for filserving and as a novelty - the machine sits in the den, where the kids can play DVDs and listen to MP3, and the Samba filserver keeps on ticking. It's the first time that I've felt confortable having little kids play games with on a computer that, at the same time, is serving files. So far, there have been no lockups or crashes.

    There are several benefits that I like with this situation - the customer gets a fun toy to play with, the "fileserver" is quiet and can nativly RSync it's precious files back to my servers for an offsite backup, and best of all - I get a reliable computer thats good for my reputation.

    Really, the fullfilment of dream for an easy to use Unix has snuck up on us in the form of a Luxo Jr. lamp.

  • I'm not sure if this is an appropriate forum for this, but I figure the Slashdot Apple community might be able to help me alleviate one concern that is stopping me from buying an iBook:

    How easy is it to remap keys in Mac OS X? I know OpenStep 4.2 had a simple keyboard configurator app that allowed me to switch between various keymaps, but in my quick in-store demo of an iBook, it didn't seem that the keyboard control panel had the same functionality. I'm not looking for any huge modifications, but I will not buy a laptop if I cannot have the caps lock button act as control...

    The other issues I have I'll have to take up with Apple personally (I don't want to buy an iBook if a new OS is going to come out in a couple months unless I'll get a free upgrade, and I don't want to pay $249 simply for a 3 year hardware warranty).
    • Thgen wait a few months for the new iBook. Jaguar is due out in August(which knowing the way they do things means the last day of August). You've obviously waited this long, so it won't kill you to wait a bit longer to get a (better) iBook with 10.2 loaded.

      The other alternative is to look at it this way... The upgrade fee won't likely be in excess of $30(I paid $19.95 for the 10.1 upgrade CD which included the Dev Tools and 9.2.2 also, when I originally only ha the 10.0.3 CD). What would you pay for a point upgrade on the Windows side? Well, let's see, Win2k was essentially NT 5.0, and WinXP is basically NT 5.1, so you'd have paid $99 for that single point.

      In comparison Apple's offering you a deal. Or you could just borrow the upgrade CD from someone who's already shelled out the cash for it, if you don't mind such unethical practices. ;-)
      • The upgrade fee won't likely be in excess of $30(I paid $19.95 for the 10.1 upgrade CD which included the Dev Tools and 9.2.2 also, when I originally only ha the 10.0.3 CD).

        Just for the record, I picked up a free 10.1 upgrade CD at the Apple Store in my home town, then downloaded the developer's tools from the Apple web site. Zero cost to go from 10.0.4 to 10.1.

        Apple may or may not do something similar with Jaguar, but it's safe to say that they've set a precedent.
    • by Dephex Twin (416238) on Friday June 21, 2002 @02:35PM (#3745014) Homepage
      How easy is it to remap keys in Mac OS X?
      ...
      I'm not looking for any huge modifications, but I will not buy a laptop if I cannot have the caps lock button act as control...

      I'm not sure about full keyboard re-mapping, but for your caps lock woes, there's uControl [versiontracker.com].

      Hope that helps!
      mark
    • I'm not entirely sure about the keymaps, but even if you buy an iBook now, it comes with coupons that will get you a free OS upgrade when its available. As well, be aware that you have up to a year after you buy the machine to decide if you want the extended warranty. In my experience, the standard 1 yr has been more than enough (the only problems I ever had with any Mac happened within that 1st year).
    • How easy is it to remap keys in Mac OS X?

      I don't mean to sound like I'm trying to evade or rework your question, but if this concern is in regards to using the control key vs. the Apple/command key, I would really encourage you to give the Apple approach a shot. I have worked on both Windows and Macs and find the Mac convention of using the Apple (or command) key to be preferable and I've known Windows users who have grown to prefer it as well for the simple reason that it's less physical space to stretch your fingers and that the Apple key is closer to the natural resting place of your hands on the keyboard. Even if you don't find those to be a compelling enough reasons, it's very easy to become adept at both (I switch between the conventions of both platforms easily at this point.)

      Having said that, I'm sure there are utilities or hacks out there to do it. Either way, I wouldn't let such a trivial matter stand in the way.

      --Rick
    • The iBook comes with a 1 year warranty, the $249 simply extends the warranty to 3 years. You'll think that's a good deal if your LCD ever breaks. A side benefit of the extended warranty is that you also get free support for that 3 year period.

      It's also worth noting that if you don't get the 3 year warranty, any time within the first year you can choose to pay the $249 to extend the warranty the additional two years.
    • I'd suppose it depends on your needs. I know some people who like to swap the control and caps lock keys to match some older terminal standards - and there is a patch out there for OS X to do that (this being a particularly tough patch due to the caps lock wanting to persist as a toggle between two states.) Beyond that I'm not sure what is available as far as whole keyboard remappers, I'm sure they're not far behind.
    • I whole-heartedly agree with you on this one. Although difficult, it is possible to remap keys under OS X. The keyboard files are in /System/Library/Keyboards. By the way, all apple computers come w/ 3 free sub-major version OS upgrades, and all minor version upgrades are free via Software Update.
    • Keymapper App (Score:2, Informative)

      by ablair (318858)
      It's not yet easy to manually remap keys in OSX, (many do with XDarwin) but you can do it by text-editing the appropriate xmodmap file you're using (Warning: the DMCA may seriously repercussions if you live in the US and try to do this... check out the scary disclaimer on this how-to [mail-archive.com] for remapping keys with XDarwin!!) This really should be something user-changeable in the System Prefs itself, under "Keyboard" and hopefully will be in Jaguar or not too long after.

      In OSX, you could manually re-map the modmap file for the appropriate keymap you want to change out of the list of keymaps in the /System/Library/Keyboards/ directory (pick yours, though I think there are even more now with 10.1.5):

      /System/Library/Keyboards
      /System/Library/Keyboards/ACE.keyboard
      /System/Library/Keyboards/ACE_102.keyboard
      /System/Library/Keyboards/Apple.keyboard
      /System/Library/Keyboards/AppleAdjJIS.keyboard
      /System/Library/Keyboards/AppleExt.keyboard
      /System/Library/Keyboards/AppleII.keyboard
      /System/Library/Keyboards/AppleISO.keyboard
      /System/Library/Keyboards/AppleISOExt.keyboard
      /System/Library/Keyboards/AppleJIS.keyboard
      /System/Library/Keyboards/Belge.keymapping
      /System/Library/Keyboards/Canadian-CSA.keymapping
      /System/Library/Keyboards/Canadian-ISO.keymapping
      /System/Library/Keyboards/Canadien.keymapping
      /System/Library/Keyboards/Dansk.keymapping
      /System/Library/Keyboards/Deutsch.keymapping
      /System/Library/Keyboards/Espanol.keymapping
      /System/Library/Keyboards/Francais.keymapping
      /System/Library/Keyboards/HIL.keyboard
      /System/Library/Keyboards/HIL_ITF_JAPANESE.keyboa rd
      /System/Library/Keyboards/HIL_JIS.keyboard
      /System/Library/Keyboards/HP_MiniDIN_JIS.keyboard
      /System/Library/Keyboards/Italiano.keymapping
      /System/Library/Keyboards/Japanese.keymapping
      /System/Library/Keyboards/LatinoAmericano.keymapp ing
      /System/Library/Keyboards/MSN.keyboard
      /System/Library/Keyboards/Netherlands.keymapping
      /System/Library/Keyboards/NeXT.keyboard
      /System/Library/Keyboards/Norsk.keymapping
      /System/Library/Keyboards/OADG_A01.keyboard
      /System/Library/Keyboards/OADG_AX.keyboard
      /System/Library/Keyboards/OADG_J3100.keyboard
      /System/Library/Keyboards/Portugues.keymapping
      /System/Library/Keyboards/Schweizer.keymapping
      /System/Library/Keyboards/Suisse.keymapping
      /System/Library/Keyboards/Svenska.keymapping
      /System/Library/Keyboards/TYPE5.keyboard
      /System/Library/Keyboards/TYPE5_Compact.keyboard
      /System/Library/Keyboards/TYPE5_Compact_JAPANESE. keyboard
      /System/Library/Keyboards/TYPE5_Compact_UNIX.keyb oard
      /System/Library/Keyboards/TYPE5_JAPANESE.keyboard
      /System/Library/Keyboards/TYPE5_PC.keyboard
      /System/Library/Keyboards/TYPE5_TUV_EUROPEAN.keyb oard
      /System/Library/Keyboards/UK.keymapping
      /System/Library/Keyboards/USA.keymapping
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/ACE.keyboar d
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/ACE_102.key board
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/Apple.keybo ard
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/AppleAdjJIS . eyboard
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/AppleExt.ke yboard
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/AppleII.key board
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/AppleISO.ke yboard
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/AppleISOExt . eyboard
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/AppleJIS.ke yboard
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/Belge.keyma pping
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/Canadian-CS A.keymapping
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/Canadian-IS O.keymapping
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/Canadien.ke ymapping
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/Dansk.keyma pping
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/Deutsch.key mapping
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/Espanol.key mapping
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/Francais.ke ymapping
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/HIL.keyboar d
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/HIL_ITF_JAP ANESE.keyboard
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/HIL_JIS.key board
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/HP_MiniDIN_ JIS.keyboard
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/Italiano.ke ymapping
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/Japanese.ke ymapping
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/LatinoAmeri cano.keymapping
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/MSN.keyboar d
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/Netherlands . eymapping
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/NeXT.keyboa rd
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/Norsk.keyma pping
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/OADG_A01.ke yboard
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/OADG_AX.key board
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/OADG_J3100. keyboard
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/Portugues.k eymapping
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/Schweizer.k eymapping
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/Suisse.keym apping
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/Svenska.key mapping
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/TYPE5.keybo ard
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/TYPE5_Compa ct.keyboard
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/TYPE5_Compa ct_JAPANESE.keyboard
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/TYPE5_Compa ct_UNIX.keyboard
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/TYPE5_JAPAN ESE.keyboard
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/TYPE5_PC.ke yboard
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/TYPE5_TUV_E UROPEAN.keyboard
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/UK.keymappi ng
      /Volumes/Mac/System/Library/Keyboards/USA.keymapp ing

      But of course, there's will soon be an easier way if you don't want to muck about. Michael Baltak's GPL'd DoubleCommand Deluxe [mac.com], under development and hopefully to be released soon should offer a good amount of flexibility in custom keymapping for free. Or, to kill the bug with a sledgehammer you could get a macro utility like Quickeys [apple.com] from CE Software and map the Caps Lock key to trigger a one-key "shortcut" of your choosing (ie: map it to another key)

      I wouldn't worry too much about paying to upgrade the OS to Jaguar, Apple so far has been fairly good about this sort of stuff. You could also wait a few months until Jaguar comes out and you might not need a keymapping utility at all, if you can bear to wait.
  • by xanthus (158940) on Friday June 21, 2002 @02:40PM (#3745038) Homepage Journal
    I could very easily have been the LAN admin [apple.com] in Apple's brilliant marketing campaign. I'm still considering writing in, if nothing else to thank them.

    I just love plugging in a piece of hardware and having it work the first time. Bring home some new hardware, connect it all up, pop in software, and everything works the first time. I have equal horror stories from the PC support that I did for many years of having to wrestle with hardware and drivers that just didn't work or weren't compatible with other pieces of hardware. Oh, The Pain, The Pain!!

    Apple has embraced unix which, last time I checked, leaves M$ Windows as the only non-unix home computer OS. To me, that makes me even more skittish of learning anything Windows related. I can't help but think that it would be a skill that won't transfer nicely to other computer platforms. In fact, I'm even starting for forget some PC-specific skills. :G:

    The old M$/Mac war has never been an issue for me. I won't argue with people for more than 5 minutes. I just grin and say "I'm an IT person. I have several computers at home and at work. I prefer Mac over Windows." They're usual the ones who press the issue. At which point I just smile and ask them why they're being so defensive?
    • "Apple has embraced unix which, last time I checked, leaves M$ Windows as the only non-unix home computer OS."



      Although I've recently switched from using primarily Linux to using OS X on a TiBook, your argument holds very little weight. I use Win2k at work and it's solid. Furthermore, MS hired the Mach MicroKernel developers to create WinNT way back in the day. These guys are excellent and experienced OS developers and they still work at Microsoft.

      Although, WindowsXP/2K may be the only non-*nix desktop OS, one can assume that it has a *nix basis, since the core team of developers do. One can especially assume that smart design decisions were for the NT kernel with regard to POSIX thread handling and what not.

      • by cpeterso (19082) on Friday June 21, 2002 @03:36PM (#3745357) Homepage

        MS hired the Mach MicroKernel developers to create WinNT way back in the day. These guys are excellent and experienced OS developers and they still work at Microsoft.


        This is not true. Yes, Mach's Rick Rashid works at Microsoft [microsoft.com]. However, he did NOT write anything for NT; he is the head of Microsoft Research. Microsoft hired Dave Cutler [microsoft.com] to write NT. Cutler worked at DEC and wrote DEC's VAX/VMS, RSX-11M and VAXELN operating systems. NT more resembles Cutler's canceled "Mira" operating system project at DEC than it does Mach. In fact, Cutler left DEC because his Mira project was canceled. He took his ideas and team of engineers to Microsoft.

        WindowsXP/2K may be the only non-*nix desktop OS, one can assume that it has a *nix basis, since the core team of developers do

        This is also not true. Dave Cutler hated Unix.

      • XP/2k has no *nix basis at all. All its developers originally worked at DEC on VMS. It has a POSIX layer, but most people consider it a pretty bad impelmentation of POSIX, at best.
      • MS hired the Mach MicroKernel developers

        Others have already addressed the MS side of the story - I just wanted to add that Avie Tevanian, one of the principle developers for Mach, was hired by NeXT when they were first formed, and continues to work at Apple. IIRC, he's a VP now.
      • You said:
        "Furthermore, MS hired the Mach MicroKernel developers to create WinNT way back in the day. These guys are excellent and experienced OS developers and they still work at Microsoft."

        To which, I say Ha!

        Sorry, I've worked for MS and in fact, worked on Cairo (Back when Cairo was going to be a next gen OS to replace NT, it has since been used to describe all kinds of things that weren't really Cairo, after Cairo was cancelled.)

        Let me just say, without violating NDAs, that NT will never effectively compete with OS X for certain, and will probably have a tough time going against Linux.

        I've had my hands on the code in question. It doesn't matter how many bright people MS hires (nevermind the fact that there will always be more brighter people who don't work for them, who are more likely to work on Linux) but the process and priorities MS uses in developing its code.

        Quality isn't even in the top 5 priorities. They say otherwise, but everyone who works there knows its just talk, and how the process is broken.
      • MS hired the Mach MicroKernel developers to create WinNT way back in the day

        What's even funnier is that As I Remember It, Avi Tevanian (sp?) was the primary Mach microkernel developer, and he works for Apple... and in fact, is their chief software guru...

        Funny...

        As far as I see it, you got it quite wrong :)
  • by PythonOrRuby (546749) on Friday June 21, 2002 @02:40PM (#3745039)
    As I mentioned on MacSlash.

    While the WSJ author made a point of criticizing Mac interaction with corporate VPNs, he failed to mention that Macs are quite often easier to integrate into Windows networks than PCs running Windows are.

    If for network interface card configuration issues alone, the Mac shines in this area, and it deserves praise for this.
    • Uh, No. I am a proud iBook owner and a big proponent of OS X, but Macs do not integrate with Windows networks easier than Windows. Like printing to a MS-network printer, browsing the network, etc. For instance, if your Mac is DHCP, it will end up having the network name of whichever Windows client previously had that IP address (rather than properly updating the local DNS/WINS server with the name of your Mac), although I'll admit this could be a server issue, the integration still isn't nice or "easier".

      But my biggest gripe about Mac's SMB integration is that if you copy a file from a Mac to an SMB share, for each file it copys you get a "bonus" file with the same name preceded by a ".". So copying 10 mp3s from my iBook to an SMB share deposits 10 extra turdlets on my Win2k server.
      • I don't discount your experiences, but mine(and the experiences of many other people) have been quite the opposite.

        Bring the Mac in, plug it in, enter the supplied IP/DHCP information, go. There's no step four. ;-)

        Bring the Dell/Gateway/HP/Compaq in, plug it in, enter the supplied information, then spend the next hour dealing with tech support, and finally get connected, but with an unreliable connection.
        • I have never, ever, had to call in anybody from Tech Support. Back about six months ago when I was in charge of keeping the embedded developers happy in a Telemetry lab, I could throw Windows on a box, without any third party anything, and expect it to authenticate and hook up to the DHCP server automatically. Of course, all the server side stuff was Unix at that shop...
  • Mossberg (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Surlyboi (96917) on Friday June 21, 2002 @02:52PM (#3745097) Homepage Journal
    I've always liked Mossberg's even keel when it came
    to Mac/'doze comparisons. If it works, he'll say so,
    if it doesn't he's not gonna sugarcoat it. Back before
    the return of Jobs, he faily accurately sized up the
    trouble with Apple and called them on it. He's shown
    the same attitude toward Microsoft.

    No ass kissing, just what he thinks works. A refreshing
    change from yesterday's Dvorak drivel.
    • I agree. Mossberg is always good. His observations are useful. Other reporters just parrot the industry buzz. Mossberg tells you whether he things the stuff works.

      Mossberg is what Jerry Pournelle SHOULD have been....

      And, I agree, he seems to be the only person in the industry who can compare Macs and PCs dispassionately and accurately.
  • Does Mr. Mossberg point out the dramatic speed difference between the GUI of Windows 2000 and Mac OS X? He should, if he really wants to write an impartial article.

    Many, many people get their computers via mail order and never have a chance to try them in person until they've already paid. Macs in particular can be VERY difficult to return for a refund once you've opened the box. Because of this, many people won't have the opportunity to use OS X prior to purchase.

    OS X, even on the G4 iMac, still lags. People should know prior to making a purchase decision.

    • Does Mr. Mossberg point out the dramatic speed difference between the GUI of Windows 2000 and Mac OS X? He should, if he really wants to write an impartial article.

      Does jchristopher have a reference beyond the vagueness of "OS X, even on the G4 iMac, still lags."? He should, if he really wants to write an impartial post.

      My experience with my G3/500 iBook has been greatly improved since the release of 10.1.5. So, if this was meant as an attempt to be insightful to the lagginess of the GUI, then let's be fair. Set up a Win2K machine that pushes all of the GUI through a PDF rendering level using software based rendering. Since you're moving the processing from the GPU to the CPU, and you're comparing to the new iMac, this theoretical Win2K machine can only utilize a P4/1GHz (I'm feeling generous). Compare this machine with a normal Win2K machine, a new iMac with = 10.1.4, and a new iMac with 10.1.5.

      Oh, one other thing, both Win2K machines are required to move the GUI out of kernel-space (what's it in there for anyway? That's just begging for a user-space program to crash the whole system).
      • As the user, I don't particularly care that OS X is slow because it's running the GUI through PDF, and I suspect that quite a few others don't care either! I know it's slow because it's pdf. But I want it to be responsive, like Windows 2000, and the REASON it's not doesn't concern me. That's Apple's problem.
    • Does Mr. Mossberg point out the dramatic speed difference

      No, as the summary says, he wrote a balanced article, not a one-sided bashing.
    • The GUI issue is something Apple has been made VERY aware of by it's customers. They have addressed it with the next release of OS X 10.2 which FINALLY moves 2D off to the video card. Every report I have read on it states that Jaguar is VERY fast. This is a now a non issue...next subject please.

  • I read this the other day, and read comments on MacCentral and elsewhere. Unless I want to be really nitpicky and anal, I don't have any real complaints about the article. I agree that EverQuest addicts and Megahertz junkies aren't going to be happy on a Mac(and we Mac users don't want them anyway), so they should stick with whatever version of Windows they're using. Same goes for those who like to pirate all their software; there's fewer people to steal software from in the Mac world. Plus, most hardcore Mac gamers are anti-piracy, because we know the Mac gaming programmers and publishers by name; we'd know exactly who we're stealing from.

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