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iWarez 829

Posted by Hemos
from the l33t-walking dept.
asv108 writes "It seems that people are finding new uses for their iPod. According to this story in Wired, a Dallas area CompUsa employee caught a teenager transferring a fresh copy of Office for OSX to his iPod from a store demo machine."
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iWarez

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  • And I thought CompUSA employees were good for nothing.
    • Re:And I Thought... (Score:5, Informative)

      by nomadic (141991) <nomadicworld&gmail,com> on Thursday February 28, 2002 @01:56PM (#3085263) Homepage
      According to the story, it was a computer consultant shopping in CompUSA who saw this.

      It's irrelevant, I guess, since nobody actually reads the stories anymore.
      • yeah... they feel able to comment with only seeing the heading text.
      • Re:And I Thought... (Score:3, Informative)

        by CMiYC (6473)
        It wouldn't be so bad, but the Slashdot summary makes it sound like the CompUSA employee did something about it. The story clearly says that the employee was clueless and did nothing about it.
    • by British (51765) <british1500@gmail.com> on Thursday February 28, 2002 @02:19PM (#3085470) Homepage Journal
      Depending on the CompUSA you go to, you can get some free entertainment. In the one in Roseville, Minnesota, there's this older guy behind the "good stuff" counter(all the smaller merchandise that can be shoplifted, etc) this guy will berate any computer-clueless customer that dares to ask him a question day in, day out. Sometimes I just stood near him pretending to look at the PDAs and listen to this guy drill into ma and Pa kettle explaining the difference between USB and FireWire. This guy IS the comic book guy of computers.
  • by sprytel (242051) on Thursday February 28, 2002 @01:52PM (#3085212)

    it was improper labeling. the sticker said "don't steal MUSIC"...

  • by Pete Bevin (291) on Thursday February 28, 2002 @01:52PM (#3085218) Homepage
    I used to do this in the late 80s - the BBC Micro had a system where you could buy add-on ROMs. I didn't have the money to buy them, so I wrote a program to copy them onto a 5.25 inch floppy. Then I'd go into stores and copy what they had.

    Glad to see some things haven't changed...
  • And this is news...? (Score:3, Interesting)

    by neuroticia (557805) <neuroticia AT yahoo DOT com> on Thursday February 28, 2002 @01:53PM (#3085223) Journal
    This is news? =] It was bound to happen eventually. Give a person a way to get something out of a store and they'll do their best to do it.

    I would think that connecting to Limewire or Hotline would be a heck of a lot easier than trying to get all of the files for OS X off of a computer, though. Sort of like stealing a stick of gum from one store instead of stealing the ingredients for gum from another store.

    -Sara
    • by Master Bait (115103) on Thursday February 28, 2002 @03:06PM (#3085881) Homepage Journal
      It is hardly news. CompUSA probably just has demos of applications software.

      Kinkos has always been the best place to get software. Sure, you have to pay by the hour, but their Macs are/were equipped with zip drives, later CDR drives, but this new Firewire thing is a real boon for getting bloatware.

      What I'd like to know is if the iPod can play music while you're getting your copy of Office. If Apple used Linux or Darwin in the iPod, that would be a no-braner!

  • by Trekologer (86619) <adb@@@trekologer...net> on Thursday February 28, 2002 @01:53PM (#3085224) Homepage
    You're telling me that a CompUSA employee caught the kid and knew what the kid was doing? Did the employee still try to sell the kid the extended warrantee?
    • Re:Wait a minute... (Score:5, Informative)

      by Masem (1171) on Thursday February 28, 2002 @01:54PM (#3085241)
      It wasn't a Compusa employee, just the author of the article; he did try to get a Compusa employee to do something, but the employee acted as if the writer was stupid.

    • by clump (60191)
      You can't even breathe in that place without getting sold a warranty or some sort of extended plan. The reason for this is that margins are so slim on large purchases (like computers and DVD players) that retailers either break even or *lose* money on them. Cables and accessories are marked up to try to make up the loss.

      I do hate that. I have argued with a CompUSA employee who insisted my mother *had* to have a $30 printer cable or her printer "would print on different pages and stuff". I wonder how long CompUSA and Best Buy can last?
      • by Com2Kid (142006)
        "The reason for this is that margins are so slim on large purchases (like computers and DVD players) that retailers either break even or *lose* money on them. Cables and accessories are marked up to try to make up the loss."

        Ugh, tell me about it. 3x markup for a SCSI cable, I eventually went online and bought it for $20 instead of the $60 that CompUSA wanted for it.

        On the other hand, they are the ONLY store within ~20-30miles of me that have a decent selection of computer cables and such. Not a great selection mind you, but _A_ selection.

        (I like in Seattle, I can damn nearly throw bricks at Microsoft, and there isn't a single d*mn friggin computer store around here! SHIT! Sucks big time.)

        Hmm, reminds me of when I was younger, at some local computer store (since closed. . . . ) that sold "used" software (open box stuff, at an inflated price mind you) they had this kids center (hey, I said I was younger, around eleven or so).

        Well all of the computers had some sort of funked out proprietary interface on them that sucked. It basically was a prettied up interface that led to games on the computer.

        Well of course one of the first lessons I had learned on a computer was that the CLI is your friend. So. . . .

        Reboot. Take notice of startup proccess. (DOS machine).

        Reboot, bypass autoexec.bat and config.sys, start exploring HD to find any sort of interesting stuff. :)

        Anyways, suffice to say some employee realized WTF I was doing (to my surprise, most store employees have NO idea what in the world a CLI is, and at many stores the employee's eyes just glaze over when they see a CLI and they just walk right on by. :) ) and told me to get off the computers and not come back. :)

  • under the DMCA for creating a circumvention device!
  • by 2nd Post! (213333) <gundbear@@@pacbell...net> on Thursday February 28, 2002 @01:53PM (#3085232) Homepage
    The person featured in the story witnessing the theft a computer consultant in the Dallas area at a local CompUSA? I don't think he was an employee of CompUSA, else he would have stopped the little bugger.

    Isn't that wonderful though? Can afford a $399 iPod but can't afford Office vX? Heck, maybe the iPod was stolen too?
    • You can copy many things to and from it.. It's really much cheaper to do so.
    • Your are right! (Score:5, Informative)

      by John Harrison (223649) <johnharrison AT gmail DOT com> on Thursday February 28, 2002 @02:05PM (#3085355) Homepage Journal
      If the poster of the article had read the story he would have noticed that is was a customer who witnessed the iPod piracy. He contacted a CompUSA employee and according to the article:

      Webb watched the teenager copy a couple of other applications. He left the kid to find a CompUSA employee. "I went over and told a CompUSA guy, but he looked at me like I was clueless," Webb said.

      Unsure whether the kid was a thief or an out-of-uniform employee, Webb watched as he left the store. "I thought there's no point in getting any more involved in this imbroglio," Webb said. "Besides, this is Texas. You never know what he might have been carrying."

      CompUSA representatives didn't respond to requests for comment. Neither did Apple officials.

      So basically the CompUSA people had no clue what was going on. Typical.

      Also note that nobody was caught as the poster claimed. The event was merely witnessed, nobody was caught.

  • Not Uniqe to iPod (Score:5, Interesting)

    by freerangegeek (451133) on Thursday February 28, 2002 @01:54PM (#3085245)
    There are plenty of pocket sized firewire and USB drives on the market that could be used to do the same thing. The iPod differs only in that it's got a really cool interface and can double as a nice MP3 player.

    Lee
    A satisified iPod [apple.com] owner.
    • If you read the article it says this as well. The problem with most of those full size devices is that they are rather bulky. The iPod is much smaller and easier to walk in and out of a store with since it is an mp3 player.
  • by Zen Mastuh (456254) on Thursday February 28, 2002 @01:55PM (#3085252)
    Yes. They shouldn't have used compusa as the password on the demo machine.

  • by DickPhallus (472621) on Thursday February 28, 2002 @01:56PM (#3085259)
    You could have fun putting files onto computers at the stores... nice goats.cx background or something... hell maybe someone will come up with a way to install linux from the ipod!
  • by shawnmelliott (515892) on Thursday February 28, 2002 @01:56PM (#3085265) Journal
    So instead of the traditional "Five Finger Discount" now it's the "Five Second Discount" ... interesting.
    • by MaxwellStreet (148915) on Thursday February 28, 2002 @02:33PM (#3085580)
      Even more interesting is the question of whether or not the iPod, or the binary data contained on the device, is subject to confiscation or seizure if they believe that you downloaded a copy of Office onto it.

      Nothing's missing . . . do they have the right to seize all those 1's and 0's?

      You could make decent arguments for both sides . . .
  • CompUSA employees (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Geek In Training (12075) <[moc.liamtoh] [ta] [893bc]> on Thursday February 28, 2002 @01:57PM (#3085276) Homepage
    From teh article: Webb watched the teenager copy a couple of other applications. He left the kid to find a CompUSA employee. "I went over and told a CompUSA guy, but he looked at me like I was clueless," Webb said.

    Isn't that a misprint? Should it not read: I look at him as though HE were clueless?

    Sounds about right... CompUSA loser is thinking, "Yeah man, sure... the kids stealing apps off out machines with his Walkman. WHATever... don't forget your tinfoil hat on that way out!"

    Just another moron who doesn't know his products or their capabilities.

    (It's not just PC workers, even today's car salesmen don't know their product. I went shopping with a friend who wanted to buy a car in the same model that I own. My friend is an informed consumer; he and I had to correct the sales guy on model names, equipment on each, engine size and wheel size on three different cars.)
  • .. this is the kind of innovation we need more of, and yet the kid will no doubt be labeled as 'Bad for Business'.

    Someone hire him in bizdev!
  • by nebaz (453974) on Thursday February 28, 2002 @01:59PM (#3085296)
    Don't worry...there are no life forms aboard...
  • "I thought there's no point in getting any more involved in this imbroglio," Webb said. "Besides, this is Texas. You never know what he might have been carrying."

    What a maroon. Way to stereotype both Texans and gunowners. Sure, like some kid is going to shoot you for ratting him out. Grow up, turn off the TV once in a while, maybe even read a book, and shut the hell up.
  • Can't you take ANY external pocket hard drive or even a keychain USB drive and do similar things? WTF does this have to do with the iPod?

    And you could take a camera into a museum or a movie camera into a theatre. But actually you can't because you'll get caught. So computer store employees should just make sure kids don't plug hard drives into computers.

    Of course if software could be freely redistributed this wouldn't be a problem, but that's another long-running and tiresome story, isn't it...

    There's no story here. NEXT!!!

  • I had to look it up. (Score:2, Informative)

    by namtog (247864)
    Unsure whether the kid was a thief or an out-of-uniform employee, Webb watched as he left the store. "I thought there's no point in getting any more involved in this imbroglio," Webb said. "Besides, this is Texas. You never know what he might have been carrying."
    One entry found for imbroglio.
    Main Entry: imbroglio Pronunciation: im-'brOl-(")yO Function: noun Inflected Form(s): plural -glios Etymology: Italian, from imbrogliare to entangle, from Middle French embrouiller -- more at EMBROIL Date: 1750 1 : a confused mass 2 a : an intricate or complicated situation (as in a drama or novel) b : an acutely painful or embarrassing misunderstanding c : a violently confused or bitterly complicated altercation : EMBROILMEN
    Found it here. [m-w.com]
  • "I went over and told a CompUSA guy, but he looked at me like I was clueless," Webb said.

    Can't say I'm stunned. Most employees are either like this or the Dilbert electronic salesman that pays to work at the store. Or better...

    Comic Book Guy: I'm interested in upgrading my 28.8 kilobaud Internet connection to a 1.5 megabit fibre-optic T-1 line. Will you be able to provide an IP router that's compatable with my token ring ethernet LAN configuration?
    Homer: (pause) Can I have some money now?

  • by jmv (93421) on Thursday February 28, 2002 @02:02PM (#3085321) Homepage
    Does that mean that iPod and computer stores should be illegal as they both allow to steal software?
    • Yes, anyone purchasing an iPod will now be arrested at the point of sale for violating the DMCA.

  • But [Mac columnist Dave] Horrigan didn't think the iPod presents a serious piracy threat to Microsoft, and doubted the company would take special measures to prevent in-store copying.

    "If Microsoft puts in protection it almost always screws up and causes problems for them or their legit users," he said.


    Since when has that ever stopped them?

    Dennis Lloyd, publisher of iPod fan site iPodlounge, also said this is the first time he'd heard of an iPod put to such use.

    "I can see how easy it would be to do," he said. "It's a shame someone has stooped this low to bring bad press to the insanely great iPod."


    How is this bringing bad press to the iPod? It can be used to copy things. That's what it's designed to do. This is like saying that someone intentionally driving their car into a busy cross walk is bad press for the car. And even if we accept the premise that it's bad press for the iPod, I really don't think that's why the kid did it.
  • by Otter (3800) on Thursday February 28, 2002 @02:02PM (#3085327) Journal
    Fortunately most CompUSA's have a security feature to prevent such unauthorized copying -- their display Macs are generally turned off, with the mouse gone and the System file deleted. Oh, and there used to always be a ladder in front of them [appleturns.com].

    Part of being an Apple zealot is going into stores and fixing the Macs up. I don't get why Apple can run such terrific retail stores themselves, but doesn't try to persuade CompUSA and Sears employees that, no, iMacs shouldn't have smoke coming out of them.

  • by thesolo (131008) <slap@fighttheriaa.org> on Thursday February 28, 2002 @02:03PM (#3085333) Homepage
    ...because he sure has some huge balls to just walk up to a demo computer and try that!!

    It's interesting to note that the article mentions Disk On Key [diskonkey.com]. A few weeks ago, my friend's place of business had a meeting, and basically the whole premise was that any visitors to the company had to have their keychains checked for such devices, as they were worried about people coming in to visit, and leaving with a copy of a database. I wouldn't be surprised if other companies start adopting a policy of searching for those types of devices either.
  • by geekopus (130194) <geekopus&yahoo,com> on Thursday February 28, 2002 @02:03PM (#3085341)
    What is up with those people?


    Dennis Lloyd, publisher of iPod fan site iPodlounge, also said this is the first time he'd heard of an iPod put to such use.

    "I can see how easy it would be to do," he said. "It's a shame someone has stooped this low to bring bad press to the insanely great iPod."


    Insanely great? Goddamn. They're all Stevebots.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 28, 2002 @02:04PM (#3085345)
    I can see the headlines now

    SOME CONSUMERS ARE USING APPLE'S PORTABLE FIREWIRE HARD DRIVE AS A PORTABLE FIREWIRE HARD DRIVE
    EXPERTS SHOCKED


    Admit it.. you're just annoyed you didn't think of doing this first

    Maybe computer stores should just hire people who know how to tell when people are copying huge quantities of files onto portable hard drives?

    Were there problems in the 80s with people copying programs off of computer display models onto floppy disks? What about with zip disks in the mid90s? What did stores do about that sort of thing then? Why is this so urgent now?
  • by Multiple Sanchez (16336) on Thursday February 28, 2002 @02:05PM (#3085358)
    Wait, a front page story on slashdot is a front page story on Wired that's entirely hearsay. A computer consultant says he saw a crime, CompUSA didn't believe him, and that's news?
  • When I was a kid, a friend and I used to go to a computerstore, he'd keep the shopkeeper busy while I was making copies of the games that ran on the demo-machines on disks.

    Taking with you a empty cd to a shop can do the same, with the cdwriters getting faster and faster,you dont have to wait for a long time, isn't there somesort of cd-writing app standardly installed on XP or MacOS?

    Even if they catch you, I don't think they're allowed to see the contents of your iPod, cdrom or other data-bearer, at least not in my country.
  • by kwashiorkor (105138) on Thursday February 28, 2002 @02:07PM (#3085368)
    From the article:

    CompUSA and other computer stores could take a few simple steps to prevent software from being copied, said Mac expert Dave Horrigan, who writes a syndicated Macintosh column.

    Any Mac can easily be configured to allow changes only by administrators, he said. Also, a system profile tool logs all peripheral equipment, but it must be running to log an iPod. For Macs running OS X, a locked dummy file in an application's package will protect the entire file from being copied without a password.

    But Horrigan didn't think the iPod presents a serious piracy threat to Microsoft, and doubted the company would take special measures to prevent in-store copying.

    Here's a suggestion: Physically block the fucking I/O ports on display models. Put a locked metal bar across them or something. Cheap, quick, and effective.
    • by Anonymous Coward
      Such a thing would defeat the purpose of a display model.

      It's definitely a plus for the store if a customer can walk up to the salesperson, hand them a box and say "This (wireless mouse|digital camera|iPod) looks really neat! Could you demonstrate it for me?" And the salesperson opens up the box, plugs it in, and demonstrates it for them. putting padlocked metal things in front of the ports will probably not make the customers all that happy. That is a bit of an issue, no? Plus, the current mac display cases are basically works of art, and besides this lots of users will want to see the back of the machine without metal in the way ("how many firewire ports does this thing have..?")

      if it's that much of a problem the store can just put some mirrors up in the corners to make sure they can see the backs of the machines at all times.

      But, hell, if the employees aren't paying attention then you could walk up to one of those g4s, open it up, take some RAM, and walk out of the store. Or just carry the g4 itself out of the store. Or walk into a 7-11, grab some milk, and walk out without paying. Computer stores could padlock the macs shut, but they often won't because they want the salespeople to be able to open up the machines on a moments whim; 7-11 could padlock the milk in place, but they won't.

      There are more cost-and-effort-effective ways to prevent shrinkage.. especailly given how rarely people will be copying stuff off display models onto ipods.
      • As you say, the customer walks up to the salesperson and asks for a demonstration of the product. The salesperson then goes to get a key to unlock the demonstration computer's ports. Demo proceeds as normal.

        The point is: restrict the customers direct access to the machine. They should ask for permission to have access to the machine beyond mousing around on the desktop without supervision.
      • by DragonMagic (170846) on Thursday February 28, 2002 @03:30PM (#3086031) Homepage
        I needed to buy a replacement Lexmark printer, because they're cheap and I do a lot of printing in b/w format, and did some shopping at Best Buy and CompUSA for price comparisons.

        At one Best Buy, they had a Z52 as a store display, as Z53s had just come out. There were no more Z52s left, and they had yet to receive the Z53s for their stock.

        Asking a manager, I got the price reduced to almost half the retail, and still got their crappy service plan thrown in for a year. When they opened it up to check for any products inside in case I was trying to smuggle them out, the cashier removed the ink cartridges and ran them across their demagnetizer.

        Why? Because they put anti-theft tags on the cartridges. People actually walk into stores and try to swipe open inkjet cartridges which have been used quite a bit as demonstration products, and are already open.

        So they're aware that people try to steal innards, but as to how far they can go, who knows? RAM may not be protectable in these methods, but other items could be.
    • "Here's a suggestion: Physically block the fucking I/O ports on display models. Put a locked metal bar across them or something. Cheap, quick, and effective."

      You're forgetting something: This requires the store owners and/or employees to have half a clue about what they're selling.

      I'm personally shocked and amazed that somebody that worked at CompUSA could figure out what was happening. Isn't this one of the signs of the Rapture?
    • by 2Bits (167227) on Thursday February 28, 2002 @03:43PM (#3086122)
      Here's a suggestion: Physically block the fucking I/O ports on display models. Put a locked metal bar across them or something. Cheap, quick, and effective.

      It's already done. I saw the I/O ports on some computers at Fry's Electronic blocked with chewing gum. Obviously, Fry's is more clued than CompUSA.

  • We'll just send the BSA after this kid, and we can all rest easy, knowing the world is a better place.

  • Anybody notice the cool 'aqua' look Slashdot logo and banner on this thread?

    A) Cool Guys!
    B) How you don't get Look'n'FeelSued!
  • kinda like the Kinko's that have Zip drives. Nothing like getting a bunch of Adobe fonts in my graphic artist days!
  • by swordgeek (112599) on Thursday February 28, 2002 @02:16PM (#3085456) Journal
    While this was just a kid trying to steal some software, it's clearly a symptom of a MUCH bigger problem. Now is the time to act on this sort of potential, before the full scope of ramifications become clear.

    1) We must legislate mandatory copy-protection into all commercial software. Perhaps all software, in fact.
    2) All storage devices most especially portable ones, must have a double license verification check on all copy operations. If you copy a file from one device (a computer) to another (an iPod), _both_ devices must independently verify the vailidity of copying/running that software on both machines, through a central license authority.
    3) Legislation must be introduced to require all new file formats to incorporate licensing checks. "Free" files (however you want to interpret free) must be so marked within the file.
    4) All new applications will be required to write only in approved licenseable formats. Within five years after the introduction of these formats, new pplications should no longer read old pre-license formats.
    5) Hardware must be legally required to support this licensing and copy-protection scheme. All non-compliant hardware will have to be turned into the appropriate depots for disposal, after a similar 'sunset' period (five years again, perhaps).

    Only in this way can we foster software innovation, encourage development, and drive technology forward. Guaranteeing security for developers in this was is a necessity, and the only way we can prevent computer piracy.

    Arresting criminals doesn't work--if it did, we wouldn't have crime anymore! What we have to do is eliminate any possibility of crimes being committed in the first place, at any cost.
  • How's this for a scenerio. Rip a dvd. Copy it to your iPod, trot over to CUSA, UPLOAD the file to their G4, tell your friends which computer it's on, share away. This could be done with anything of course, not just a DVD. While CUSA is busy password protecting M$ Offal, "enterprising" youths are taking advantage of plenty of storage to create some easy and quick offline storage. Why wait hours for the big stuff to download even over a cable modem. Just drag and drop whatever files you want. It'd be easy enough to hide the files/directories on the Macs, and since their demo machines, they're likely to have tons of space free. Bit more dangerious of course, but oh so convenient.
  • Innovation (Score:5, Funny)

    by ocie (6659) on Thursday February 28, 2002 @02:25PM (#3085513) Homepage
    It makes me sad to see stores limiting this kid's ability to innovate.

  • by lupercalia (310569) on Thursday February 28, 2002 @02:25PM (#3085518) Homepage
    The clueless salesman reminds me of the joke:

    Q: What's the difference between a used car salesman and a computer salesman?

    A: The used car salesman knows when he's lying.
  • Back in the Day.. (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Quizme2000 (323961) on Thursday February 28, 2002 @02:29PM (#3085548) Homepage Journal
    About 10 years ago I used to hang out in the mac lab at a local university while my Mom went to classes. I used to have a 2GB external HD the pluged in to the wall and used a huge scsi cable to hook up to the back of the Mac. I had copies of everything and they (computer lab guys) watched me do it, and said nothing. Times have changed (a little)and I became an adult. Yes you can get in a significant amount of trouble *if your caught*. It is very easy to steal anything regardless of how you physically do it, thats why we laws that say if your *caught* you will be punished. If you are over 18 and you pulled this stunt, *I* would have no problem reporting you as a shoplifter. this kid is the reason/excuse we have for crappy laws like the DMCA. IMHO if your moral standards are such that you *know* your stealing from someone and say its ok because they didn't lock it up good enough, then your sliding down a very slippery slope. (but I'll still visit you in jail when you get caught)
  • Hmm... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by dasmegabyte (267018) <das@OHNOWHATSTHISdasmegabyte.org> on Thursday February 28, 2002 @02:34PM (#3085584) Homepage Journal
    CompUSA eh? I'm surprised they even knew it WAS a Macintosh. Honestly, I've gone into that store to look for accessories for my mac and had them try and sell me a Compaq. Hello? Dumbass? I *HAVE* a mac, and I'm trying to purchase accesories for it. I don't want to buy a third rate PC with an updated "model number."

    Incidentally, I'd like to point out that the ease with which you can pirate software from a Macintosh raises an interesting point with Apple's vision. You install OfficeX by copying it where you want it...similar to the way you installed software on PCs before the invention of the "install wizard." Somebody realised that a single motion (drag program to applications) was easier than clicking through a dozen confusing menus. Somebody realized the time to ask for a serial number was when you tried to run a program, not while the install CD was in the drive.

    Oh, and I'd like to mention in this anonymous forum that I steal bandwidth from the Apple store all the time. That lovely open (well, i consider 128bit WEP pretty open) Airport network is perfect for chilling in the mall with my palmtop, comparing online prices to b&m.
  • HelLO!!!! (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Guppy06 (410832) on Thursday February 28, 2002 @02:38PM (#3085623)
    "Webb watched the teenager copy a couple of other applications. He left the kid to find a CompUSA employee. 'I went over and told a CompUSA guy, but he looked at me like I was clueless,' Webb said."

    If this isn't a wake-up call to stores like CompUSA, I don't know what is. If you treat and pay your employees like Wal-Mart employees, you're going to get people with the computer knowledge of Wal-Mart employees. Hand-holding employees through training isn't the answer because all that will give you is employees that require somebody else to do all their thinking for them while making them believe that they already know everything.

    The reason the employees in stores like these don't have half a brain is because those that DO have half a brain can make far more money doing something else. Hell, people who answer tech support calls typically make more money than retail employees.

    This is nothing more than CompUSA getting what it pays for.
  • by Lawmeister (201552) on Thursday February 28, 2002 @03:01PM (#3085841) Homepage
    Webb said. "Besides, this is Texas. You never know what he might have been carrying."

    now that is reasurring... a Mac user packing heat.

    Now if every computer user carried a weapon, you think the RIAA and MPAA would be fucking with us?

    :)
  • by Suppafly (179830) <.slashdot. .at. .suppafly.net.> on Thursday February 28, 2002 @03:03PM (#3085859)
    Anyone know if there is a way to quickly reset the ipod? If you get caught borrowing software, it would be nice to be able to quickly and easily delete all the evidence.
  • by maggard (5579) <michael@michaelmaggard.com> on Thursday February 28, 2002 @03:05PM (#3085875) Homepage Journal
    With the increasing popularity of portable devices it's getting easier to copy things to non-disc media.

    In my own case last week I was visiting my parents, Dad wanted me to burn a bunch of pictures to a CD for him to send out to relatives. Now, he's got an iMac without a burner and I live 6 hours away in another country. I could have sent them online (we've both broadband) but with the rate caps it would have taken many hours to send the 300-some MB of files and the AppleTalk IP I've got running on my wintel boxes is a bit unreliable for big long slow stuff like that.

    The solution? We both have Canon PowerShot cameras (S100 & S110), both with their shipped small CompactFlash cards and both with 3rd party 128MB CF's we've each added. Grabbing his CF's and clearing mine out I was able to load everything onto the CF's though the cameras, bring them home and burn to CDs.

    Worked fine, the CDs have been sent out and his CFs are in the mail on the way back to him loaded with some mp3s of radio shows I know he and Mom will enjoy listening to. Now I'm looking at investing in one of those small USB "hard drive" devices for storing my emergency software/system tools on. Easier to carry then a CD, hand it off of the keychain and pull it out whenever I've a need for a PGP key, repair utility or favorite bit of software.

  • by codexus (538087) on Thursday February 28, 2002 @03:41PM (#3086107)
    I mean to be forced to get his warez at CompUsa instead of getting a copy from a friend... He probably has no internet connection either since he could have easily downloaded office if he had. This is a very sad story.
  • iPods Suck (Score:4, Funny)

    by Ukab the Great (87152) on Thursday February 28, 2002 @05:09PM (#3086711)
    I installed MS Office on my iPod two weeks and Excel still doesn't work. No matter how many times I jog the dial. But I've got to admit, the talking paper clip really does have a beautiful singing voice.
  • by suwalski (176418) on Thursday February 28, 2002 @09:57PM (#3088211)
    I wanted to see if I could easily do this with a MultiMedia card. They're the postage-stamp sized Flash memory cards.

    Anyhow, I walked into Business Depot, stuck this thing into a Palm, and copied away. There wasn't really anything worthwhile to copy on the demo at the store, I mainly wanted to see if it would read my digital camera images. Point is, MMCs are yet another good strategy for this (but not office, it's too big!)

"Card readers? We don't need no stinking card readers." -- Peter da Silva (at the National Academy of Sciencies, 1965, in a particularly vivid fantasy)

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