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When will large-scale IPv6 deployment happen?

Displaying poll results.
Before 2020
  5357 votes / 30%
2020-2024
  3581 votes / 20%
2025-2029
  998 votes / 5%
2030-2034
  359 votes / 2%
2035-2039
108 votes / 0%
2040 or later
  709 votes / 4%
Never
  2063 votes / 11%
When we build a new internet
  4403 votes / 25%
17578 total votes.
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  • Don't complain about lack of options. You've got to pick a few when you do multiple choice. Those are the breaks.
  • Feel free to suggest poll ideas if you're feeling creative. I'd strongly suggest reading the past polls first.
  • This whole thing is wildly inaccurate. Rounding errors, ballot stuffers, dynamic IPs, firewalls. If you're using these numbers to do anything important, you're insane.
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When will large-scale IPv6 deployment happen?

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  • IPv6 Addresses (Score:5, Interesting)

    by bchat (267083) on Wednesday June 11, 2014 @01:55PM (#47214479) Homepage
    IPv6 addresses are so long that you can't remember them long enough to read the address from one machine and type it into another. I understand it requires a long number to have a large enough address space. But, it seems unworkable from a human perspective. No I haven't thought of a better solution. I'm just saying that this is a significant usability problem and a barrier to adoption.
    • Re:IPv6 Addresses (Score:5, Interesting)

      by KingOfBLASH (620432) on Wednesday June 11, 2014 @02:19PM (#47214839) Journal

      Just use a different base.

      For instance, 5000 is the following:
      in base 2, 1001110001000
      in base 8, 11610
      in base 10, 5000
      in base 16, 1388
      in base 32, 4 {28} 8
      in base 62, 1 {18} 40
      in base 100, 50 {0}

      You might say "Oh but who is going to remember so many characters?" Well, uppercase letters + lowercase letters + numbers is 62 characters already. Plus you have several symbols on the keyboard.

      Of course, 16^24 (that's the size of the ipv6 space) is so big you'll never be able to crunch it down to 5 characters, but there's all kinds of things you can do to make it smaller and more readable

      • Re:IPv6 Addresses (Score:4, Informative)

        by almitydave (2452422) on Wednesday June 11, 2014 @03:47PM (#47215947)

        Just use a different base.

        This problem was solved waaaay back in 1996 by the IETF in RFC 1924 [ietf.org].

        • by Cow Jones (615566)

          I don't think that's a viable solution to the OP's issue ("IPv6 addresses are so long that you can't remember them"). From the RFC:

          For example, consider the address shown above
          1080:0:0:0:8:800:200C:417A
          ...
          Then, when encoded as specified above, this becomes:
          4)+k&C#VzJ4br>0wv%Yp

          It's shorter, yes, but much harder to memorize. Especially when this address can be abbreviated to
          1080::8:800:200C:417A

          The author's views about his suggestion's efficiency are also... inter

          • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

            by Anonymous Coward

            Uh, you might want to look at the date on that RFC. The whole thing is a joke. Written by a guy who was involved with the IETF IPng working group, and was well aware of why the format was chosen to be what it is.

            More to the point: use DNS.

            More to the meta-point: IPv6 is already entering wide-scale deployment. I saw a Verizon report that something like 30% of their LTE traffic was over IPv6.

            • by Cow Jones (615566)

              Ah. Well played.

              I really need to look at the dates more. Might explain some of the design documents in our company...

            • More to the point: use DNS.

              This response always pisses me off. What do you do when DNS is broken? What do you do when you are the guy setting up DNS services? With IP 4 it is pretty easy to remember a 4 number string long enough to transpose some addresses. It is easy enough to remember a small handful of well known DNS servers' addresses so that you can get a machine talking on the Internet or on your local network. IP 6 has a short-hand notation, but it's still a pain. Looking at the example given, when transposing that addre

              • by geoskd (321194)

                This response always pisses me off. What do you do when DNS is broken? What do you do when you are the guy setting up DNS services? With IP 4 it is pretty easy to remember a 4 number string long enough to transpose some addresses. It is easy enough to remember a small handful of well known DNS servers' addresses so that you can get a machine talking on the Internet or on your local network. IP 6 has a short-hand notation, but it's still a pain. Looking at the example given, when transposing that address one has to hold in mind 5 sets of variable-length numbers (in Hexidecimal, no less) and remember the location for the double-colons.

                Short answer: write it on a piece of scrap paper, or put it into a note on your tablet|phone|pda.

                My god, are we so enamored of our technology that we have abandoned the pen and paper?

        • What a pity "/." is not a valid ipv6 address!

        • by dfn5 (524972)

          IPv6 addresses are so long that you can't remember them long enough to read the address from one machine and type it into another.

          This problem was solved waaaay back in 1996 by the IETF in RFC 1924 [ietf.org].

          It was actually solved back in 1983 by RFC 882 [ietf.org].

        • by AmiMoJo (196126) *

          I wouldn't say "solved". The two examples they give in the RFC are "1080::8:800:200C:417A" and "+k&C#VzJ4br>0wv%Yp".

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by mlts (1038732)

        This might be another good reason to learn kanji or traditional Chinese as a character set. This definitely would get the amount of characters needed per slot down by quite a number.

        • Why not Simplified Chinese? Just as many characters as Traditional and much faster to read and write. (The "simplification" refers to a reduction in the number of strokes per character, not in the number of characters.)

      • Just use a different base.

        Well, by remembering domain names instead of IP addresses you're basically using base 26.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      DNS still works just fine and IPv6 has a built-in feature to use globally unique self-applied addresses. It is the EUI-64 standard. [ieee.org] Essentially all that happens is a system uses the network portion of whatever it is connected to and the rest is autogenerated by using the MAC address split in half with an FFFE inserted.

      That is how it is in all IPv6 deployments I have seen. There is no reason to do static addressing anymore, save for servers and the like.

    • by geekoid (135745)

      Why would you do that?
      That said., copy it to you phone. Or a flash drive, or write it to CD.

    • by Eric Smith (4379)

      IPv6 addresses are so long that you can't remember them long enough to read the address from one machine and type it into another.

      Which is not a problem because normal people don't have to read the IP address from one machine and type it into another. They use DNS and DHCP, which were specifically intended to eliminate the overwhelming majority of instances of dealing with IP addresses directly.

      I've been a networking software engineer for most of my career, so I do have to deal directly with IP address

    • by dbIII (701233)
      We have DNS because IPv4 addresses are too long to remember :)
      Before that we had host files :)
      Your "significant usablility problem" was thought of and dealt with before most of the readers here were born.
    • IPv6 sort of demands that you forget everything you know about IPv4. Once you get IPv6, you'll ask yourself why anybody still uses IPv4. For example.

      There are more /48 networks in IPv6 space than there are IPv4 addresses. Everybody ought to get a /48 network which include 18 quintillion addresses. The first part of the a global unicast address is often referred to as a prefix and all your IP's will have that. The second part may be derived from you NIC's MAC. So there is some good sense to it.

      You'll r

    • by SumDog (466607)

      It's called DNS

    • by mars-nl (2777323)

      How do we manage this with phone numbers? We have someone call or text us, store the received number in our cell phone's phonebook, give it a descriptive name and we forget about the number. If only we had something like this for IP-addresses... Oh, we do! It's called DNS and works fine for both IPv4 and IPv6.

      Can we now please stop whining people cannot remember 128 bits?

  • We will switch to IPv6 not one single day before we force the telecoms to give out real, publicly-routable addresses rather than throwing up layer after layer after layer of IPv4 NAT'ing. And we can't even agree about network neutrality?

    Thus my answer to the poll, "never".
  • all of our awesome jokes will need to be updated to keep up with the times!!

    "Hey baby. Your ::1 or mine?!?"

  • Most of the new Internet users are now mobile, people get smartphones before they get computers, the cheapest Android phone I could find around here now is $40 with a 240x320 crap screen and they'd still need a cell phone. I don't know and I've never bothered to find out what my IP address is when I'm on the phone. So I figure the Internet will continue to grow, you'll probably pay another $1/month if you want an IPv4 address and a lot of people won't bother. A lot of people don't run servers or host games

    • Thanks for the rerash.

      People do use VoIP. And of course people don't use services that break in a NAT, they can't.

    • by compro01 (777531)

      Actually, mobile networks seem to be adopting IPv6, as there are sufficiently large numbers of clients that NAT breaks down. Specifically, that even the 10/8 block is too small to accommodate all the users without breaking it up into multiple separate NATed networks, with the annoyance that implies.

      • Actually, mobile networks seem to be adopting IPv6,

        Hum.

        bash-3.2$ ip addr show dev rmnet0
        2: rmnet0: <UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc pfifo_fast state UNKNOWN qlen 1000
        link/[530]
        inet 10.2.148.75/8 scope global rmnet0
        inet 10.2.148.75/24 brd 10.2.148.255 scope global rmnet0
        inet6 fe80::1c69:a3e7:7a60:52f0/64 scope link
        valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever

        Not all of them. (This is Free Mobile, in France.)

        • by jandrese (485)
          A lot of times they're adopting IPv6 internally, but translating to IPv4 for the devices (older ones don't support V6 anyway) and doing a lot of magic to keep everything straight. This works because phones spend most of their time idle and you can reuse IP addresses aggressively for the active phones.
  • It'll be when we're rebuilding civilization after Y2K38. Though personally, I'm rooting for Apophis to whack us in 2036, making the time_t rollover academic.
  • by drwho (4190) on Thursday June 12, 2014 @12:26AM (#47219597) Homepage Journal

    I have 65536 Ip addresses. Who wants to buy? $18 each.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      I'll take the lot!

      IPv4 adresses for sale! $25 each!

  • by camperdave (969942) on Thursday June 12, 2014 @12:34AM (#47219613) Journal
    What do you mean by Large Scale Deployment? Every Apple computer, and most iPhones; Every Windows 7,8,8.1, Server 2008, Server 2012 machine; Every Linux box; all non end-of-life Cisco equipment, Juniper equipment; Every BSD, OpenVMS, HP-UX, and Solaris box; IBM big iron machines; lots of 4g cell phones, They all are IPv6 ready and capable.

    Sounds like a pretty large scale deployment to me.
    • by swillden (191260)

      What do you mean by Large Scale Deployment?

      IPv6 being used to route a significant percentage of Internet traffic.

  • China has a much lower pool of available IPv4 numbers and the layered NAT as used in India creates too many hassles to last long in a place that can organise at scale - so if they are not already doing it in bulk it's not far off. As others have noted in the US there are already large deployments using IPv6 simply because that's the only way to get a million spare static addresses these days.
  • Recycle old ranges (Score:4, Interesting)

    by scsirob (246572) on Thursday June 12, 2014 @02:29AM (#47219959)

    In the early days companies were able to claim entire class B or class C address ranges without much penalty. Usually only a few of these addresses are reachable from the outside world. Some companies don't even exist anymore but the range just lingers on.

    A real world example is my former employer Exabyte. They used to produce tape streamers and libraries, the remnants are now part of Tandberg. They claimed the entire 161.81/16 address range in the early nineties. All but a few were reachable from the outside. Today there's still a few addresses active, but most of the range is lost.

    Go through the list of address range owners. If they expose less than half of their range to the outside world, recycle. DNS will cope with the changes.

  • I advice you to look for CJDNS package. It's IPV6, and it has some properties useful for today's Russia. And for post-Snowden USA too, I believe.

  • We have large-scale deployment already.

    Looking at the Google IPv6 stats [google.com], we can see that IPv6 is already used by nearly 4% of users globally. This number has more than doubled compared to one year ago. These statistics show actual enabled usage, showing that everything from end device, router, ISP and the route to Google supports IPv6.

    More significantly, there are some countries that have a much higher IPv6 user share. The USA and Germany have around 8%, and Belgium already even has 20% IPv6 users, and S

  • I have been using native IPv6 for about three years.

  • As the cheap, consumer-grade routers that don't support IPv6 people have in their homes die off, people will replace them with cheap, consumer-grade routers that DO support IPv6. It will be a slow process, but it will happen eventually.

    At that point it will be up the ISPs to provide IPv6 support. Some (like Comcast, oddly) already do. But the cynic in me thinks we'll probably see more ISPs putting up CGNAT and charging people $14.95/month for a public IP, after they've upgraded to a business account of cour

Nothing is impossible for the man who doesn't have to do it himself. -- A.H. Weiler

 



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